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Aug
27

Planning key when school, diabetes mix

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Attending school or getting a child with diabetes ready for school presents an added challenge. School supplies and pencils and pens are joined by diabetes testing supplies, needles or insulin pens. Proper planning and measures, however, can counter the anxiety and stress.

A parent of a child with diabetes should first contact the school and connect with the school nurse. A health plan specific to the child should be carefully crafted with providers or a diabetes care team. The child must be properly educated to safely attend school and the school must be prepared and educated on the exact needs of any child living with diabetes.

The Joslin Diabetes Center makes some basic points to cover with school and diabetes mix:

  • Know the school’s policies
  • Create a plan specific for each person
  • Provide the school with a container of supplies
  • Investigate the cafeteria and menu plans
  • Select a means for disposal of sharps
  • Have a plan for field trips and special events

Students who qualify for services under the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA), should have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This is the document that sets out what the school is going to do to meet the child’s individual educational needs. There are a lot of specific rules about developing an IEP, reviewing it, and what it must contain. Because IEPs are so detailed and have specific requirements, school districts often use their own form. Although students with diabetes who qualify for services under IDEA are also covered by Section 504, there is no need to write two separate plans. Diabetes provisions should be included in the IEP.

The term “504 Plan” refers to a plan developed to meet the requirements of a federal law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (commonly referred to as “Section 504”).

A 504 Plan sets out the actions the school will take to make sure the student with diabetes is medically safe, has the same access to education as other children, and is treated fairly. It is a tool that can be used to make sure that students, parents/guardians, and school staff understand their responsibilities and to minimize misunderstandings.

The American Diabetes Association recommends that every student with diabetes have a Section 504 Plan or other written accommodations plan in place.

Students leaving for college should also take steps to prepare for the new demands of college life and the continued health needs of living with diabetes.

For more, visit: Back to School with Diabetes | The Basics or Written Care Plans for School

Aug
14

Cloud-assisted blood sugar monitoring near

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cgm_googleThe future of glucose monitoring seemed very promising after a recent announcement that Dexcom, a leader in Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), announced plans to partner with Google to provide the next generation of monitoring technology that will involve smaller sensors and data stored “in the cloud” for instant archiving and record-keeping.

Dexcom will work with the new Google Life Sciences company to make bandage-thin CGM devices. Google Life Sciences, a part of the parent company Alphabet, is one of the companies created in a recent Google corporate reshuffling.

CGM devices give glucose readings continuously through the day. This helps people with diabetes track their blood sugar levels in more effectively. Blood sugar monitors use finger sticks for each reading, but CGM can provide up to 288 glucose readings a day. Most CGM users have type 1 diabetes, but some patients with type 2 diabetes who are insulin-dependent also use CGM.

Diabetes Management & Supplies is a certified distributor of Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices and a provider of diabetes education and insulin pump training. For more information on CGM, insulin delivery or training needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

For more on this CGM advancement, see:

Jun
29

Jockey with diabetes shares winners circle path

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chris_cardfrontChris Rosier is well on his mission of bringing hope and becoming a positive role model to children living with type 1 diabetes. Rosier, the Diabetes Management & Supplies spokesman, was invited to be a guest speaker at the annual Arizona American Diabetes Association’s Camp (AZDA) held at Friendly Pines.

Rosier and the campers discussed different types of pumps, testing strips, and more seriously, the struggles and stigma that follow this disease. “I don’t remember my life without diabetes,” said 14-year-old Ginger Netten of Scottsdale.

Rosier, 34, was in his mid-20s before he was diagnosed. “I went blind for a week,” Rosier said. “You want to make a grown man cry. Take away his sight.”

Learn more about Chris by visiting the DMS blog: Jockey set to motivate youth with diabetes.

Full article from the Daily Courier (AZ): Diabetes does not have to hold you back.

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Jun
05

Jockey set to motivate youth with diabetes

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Race days are fast-paced and exciting for jockey Chris Rosier, but they are also full of challenges and victories related to his life with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Management & Supplies is giving Rosier, the only professional jockey with Type 1 diabetes racing in the United States, an opportunity to greatly impact the lives of children living with diabetes.

chris_cardfrontRosier was born in San Diego, but he says he “grew up” at the horse tracks.  He traveled and moved around quite a bit and now calls Haughton in Bossier Parish his home. While he has competed in big and small arenas, he has the distinction of racing in one of the biggest events of all, the Kentucky Derby. Rosier rode Summer Bird to a sixth-place finish in the 2009 Kentucky Derby.

Rosier has been riding professionally since he was 19, but found out he had diabetes when he was in his early 20s. His diagnosis came shortly after he broke his collarbone during a spill off a horse. Later, he was stricken by temporary blindness. Soon after, his doctors diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes.

This summer, DMS will sponsor a series of appearances at diabetes camps for children.  Rosier will participate in Camp AZDA (Arizona Diabetes Association) June 6-12 and return to Louisiana in July for Camp Victory, the diabetes session of the Lions Club camps for children with medical or special needs.

Rosier, the company’s “Face of Diabetes,” is a part of the DMS patient family and feels it is important that children and teenagers know that diabetes does not limit them from having and achieving dreams. Rosier controls his diabetes with the help of Insulin Pump therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring. He wears both the Medtronic Insulin Pump and Enlite Continuous Glucose Monitor supplied by DMS.

Rosier has entered the Equibase Top 100 tier five times since 2000 and is currently ranked 145th out of 1,253 jockeys with $748,699 in earnings in 2015.

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May
22

Heat and insulin: Know the facts, plan ahead

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Extreme temperatures can affect insulin and make it unsafe or less effective in controlling blood sugar. The rules have changed from previous times when insulin used to control diabetes was beef or pork insulin. Unopened insulin is stored in the refrigerator and once opened the various types of insulin can be stored at or near room temperature for a little less than a month. Please consult your packaging for exact temperatures and storage length for your prescription.

The original pork and beef insulin formulations were supposed to be kept cold all the time. Those cold insulin injections create a sting so the move to being able to keep the newer human insulin at room temperature was a big step in the comfort of people taking daily shots.

The American Diabetes Association offers these tips for storing insulin:

  • Do not store your insulin near extreme heat or extreme cold.
  • Never store insulin in the freezer, direct sunlight, or in the glove compartment of a car.
  • Check the expiration date before using, and don’t use any insulin beyond its expiration date.
  • Examine the bottle closely to make sure the insulin looks normal before you draw the insulin into the syringe.
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May
22

Follow precautions to keep summer fun, safe

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People living with diabetes should not wait until temperatures approach 100 to take precautions. According to the National Weather Service, individuals with diabetes should begin taking precautions when the heat index reaches 80 or 90 to avoid heat stroke, sunstroke, and other problems.

Getting plenty of water and avoiding long periods of unprotected exposure to the sun are simple steps that might help.

It is common to protect insulin from temperature extremes, but health care providers or diabetes educators should be asked about the harm that high temperatures can cause to oral medications, glucose monitors, strips and insulin pumps.

Visit WebMD for more on preparing or summer with diabetes

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Jan
30

Jockey relates and inspires youth with diabetes

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Race days are fast-paced and exciting for jockey Chris Rosier, but they are also full of the challenges and victories related to his life with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Management & Supplies is inviting a group of young people with diabetes to meet Rosier, the only professional jockey with Type 1 diabetes racing in the United States today.

A Day at the Races will be held on Lundi Gras, the Monday before Mardi Gras at the Fairgrounds in New Orleans. The participants range from 6 to 17.

web_chris_vertRosier, the company’s “Face of Diabetes,” is a member of the DMS patient family and he wants young children and teenagers to know that having diabetes does not limit them from having and achieving their dreams. Rosier controls his diabetes and with the help of Insulin Pump therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring. He wears both the Medtronic Insulin Pump and Enlite Continuous Glucose Monitor supplied by DMS.

The day of the event, Rosier will lead a tour of the stable and paddock. After the big race, each tour participant will be invited into the Winner’s Circle to take pictures with the winning jockey and horse.

Rosier was born in San Diego, but he says he “grew up” at the horse tracks.  He traveled and moved around quite a bit. He calls Haughton in Bossier Parish his home. While he has competed in big and small arenas, he has the distinction of racing in one of the biggest events of all, the Kentucky Derby. Rosier rode Summer Bird to a sixth-place finish in the 2009 Kentucky Derby.

Rosier has been riding professionally since he was 19, but found out that he had diabetes when he was in his early 20s. His diagnosis came shortly after he broke his collarbone during a spill off a horse. Later, he was stricken by temporary blindness. Soon after, his doctors diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes.

He regained his health and strength, climbed back into the saddle and back into professional racing. He soon gained all the motivation he needed for his life and career. “I have three kids and a wife that support me and keep me going,” Rosier said.

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Jan
20

This is a test: Best repeated tomorrow!

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0127-accu-chek-aviva-meterPeople living with diabetes are given a host of numbers in reports from their doctor’s visits. Those numbers are very important, but should be paired with the information that can be gained every day through home monitoring of blood sugar.

Blood sugar testing is very important because it helps you manage your diabetes on a day-to-day basis. Blood sugar numbers help you to understand and take control of your diabetes.

Tools used at home to test and monitor blood sugar levels include blood glucose meters and Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices. Speaking with your doctor or another member of your diabetes treatment team will help you decide which monitoring method is best for you.

When and how many times to test your levels each day will vary from person to person so you should follow the specific testing schedule your physician has established with you. Many schedules may call for once-daily testing while others require two or more testing time that might be before or after meal.

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Jan
20

NoYo#: Know Your Numbers to reach goals

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Daily blood sugar levels plus lab reports are just two tools needed to develop a road map to diabetes management success.  Knowing those numbers tells you where you are, but goals represent where you would like to be.

A lab report crucial to your goal-setting is your A1C level also known as hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c. The A1C is a common test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It measures how well diabetes is managed over a period of time instead of just one instance. An A1C reading of 6.5 is the usual indicator of a diabetes diagnosis.

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A1C test recommendations

  • Every 6 months when you are meeting treatment goals and have stable blood sugars.
  • Every 3 months when therapy has changed or if you are not meeting blood sugars targets.
  • Used by physician to allow for timely decisions on therapy changes.
  • In-home testing may be done with across the counter testing device called A1C Now®.  See this at www.a1cnow.com

When setting goals, it is important to strive for noted, but reasonable change. Home testing may be recorded each day, but it might take three to six months to evaluate the big picture and see true progress or regression. Be very patient and don’t expect to drive your averages down or up like the numbers on a scale. Slow and steady not only wins the race, but it also provides a safe playing field for your diabetes treatment plan.

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Oct
24

Fall into some good habits: Take a hike!

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UntitledIn almost every corner of the country, fall signals a beautiful change in outside scenery or a reprieve from hot or cold conditions. Walking may be just the ticket for those looking to increase their exercise and physical activity.

Walking is one of the most highly recommended forms of physical activity for people with diabetes. It requires very little preparation and cost. It can be done practically anywhere – parks, malls, and in the street or the woods.

perform_shoeTake good care of your feet and they will take care of you. You might not spend a lot, but invest in good walking shoes. The shoes need to fit comfortably, with plenty of room in the toe area. They should not rub at the heel. Some walking shoes include an extra pair of eyelets close to your ankle. Lacing these may help prevent heel friction. Make sure your walkers have flatter, broader soles, which help improve balance.

Wear good socks. Cotton socks can bunch and retain moisture. Check out newer synthetic fabrics that wick moisture away from the skin.

A regular walk will be an effective way to control blood pressure. People living with diabetes should consider these tips from About Health magazine before taking off.

  • Begin slowly and easily. Walking just 5 or 10 minutes on the first day is perfectly acceptable if that’s all you can accomplish. The important thing is to not get injured or sore, which could end a walking campaign at the starting line.
  • Add 5 or 10 minutes per week. As one continues to improve, aim for 45 minutes to an hour, five to seven days per week. That’s an ideal amount of time for blood glucose maintenance. However, health benefits begin to accrue at just 30 minutes per day.
  • Break it up. Several 10- to 15-minute sessions are just as effective as one longer walk.
  • Count your steps. During the last few years, pedometers — small devices that clip to the belt to count steps — have become popular. They can help track total steps taken on daily walks, or all day long. Recording walking totals can be motivating.
  • Find a place to walk. If one’s neighborhood is unsafe, limit walking to daytime, walk in groups or try a nearby school track, community center or shopping mall.

For more on specialized shoes, check out the I-RUNNER line of diabetic shoes or our full line at Onlinestore-Diabetesms.com.

 

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.