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Archive for July, 2013

Jul
12

Plate Method a visual tool in diabetes control

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The nutrition of diabetes control is divided between choice and portion. While it is important to make wise food choices that encourage good blood sugar control, it is also important to practice portion control and add foods in the right combinations.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and Diabetes Management & Supplies (DMS) advocate portion control strategies for people living with any form of diabetes and for those trying to prevent diabetes.

The ADA suggest “creating your plate” as an easy way to get started with managing blood glucose levels.

“You don’t need any special tools or have to do any counting,” the ADA Web site says. “It’s simple and effective—draw an imaginary line on your plate, select your foods, and enjoy your meal! You may have heard of this as the ‘Plate Method.’”

The DMS “I’m in Control” diabetes education program details meal planning and the Plate Method in its Healthy Eating section.

The plate method is a way to visualize proper portion sizes using a 9-inch plate. Make half of your plate non-starchy vegetables, a fourth of your plate protein and a fourth of your plate starch. On the side you may either have a serving of low fat milk or a serving of fruit. Following the plate method helps to ensure that you eat a well-balanced meal containing all the necessary food groups and stay within recommended carbohydrate intake.

Menu Planning

  • Start with the Carb choices allowed on your meal plan – how many – what is a serving size?
  • Add the correct amount of Protein food – usually about 2-4 ounces of meat per meal (size of your palm) cooked using a low-fat method
  • Add no more than one or two servings of Fat per meal. Add none if you include fried foods at that meal or if trying to lose weight. (1 tsp = 1 serving)

Elaine Blackwood, DMS certified diabetes educator, appreciates the visual appeal of the Plate Method and will often use paper plates and markers to help others plan, plot and visualize meals. “Many of us are hands-on,” Blackwood says. “We need to either see or touch something.”

The ADA plate method is detailed in the video below.


For more on summer picnic and cook-out ideas, check out “Get Ready for Summer Picnics and Barbecues” from the American Diabetes Association.

DMS offers diabetes self-management and diabetes education services. For more information on specific exercise needs or to enroll in group or individual sessions, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

Contact DMS diabetes educator Elaine Blackwood at EBlackwood@diabetesms.com.

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Jul
10

Don’t let diabetes sideline you at the cook-out

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Summer-grill--party--BBQ-jpgThe summer months are a prime time for outdoor dining and entertaining. People living with diabetes may think that they have to miss out on, but there’s no reason to stay home and miss the fun. From holiday cook-outs to weekend barbecues, the fun time summertime gives people living with diabetes several opportunities to be social and healthy butterflies.

Elaine Blackwood, Diabetes Management & Supplies certified diabetes educator advises that you plan ahead and keep blood sugar and portion control in mind. “I always encourage looking for veggies but not the dip to munch on,” Blackwood said adding that a couple pieces of cheese is great finger food while mingling at a cook-out.

shrimp_appChef John Wright’s collection contains a Shrimp Appetizer that can also be served over rice or pasta and used as a side dish. Served alone, the shrimp appetizer doesn’t contain any carbohydrates and can be a great substitute on the chip-and-dip table with the other crunchy snacks. Loading up on low-carb items and fruits and veggies will help control the blood-sugar spikes that can often occur after a cook-out or barbecue.

Blackwood also recommends bringing your own bottled water in case your hosts only have soda or alcohol. It is also a perfect time to drink flavored water or sugar-free soda as a treat.

Another strategy is to not leave home hungry. “Depending on the timing of the barbecue, I try to keep my timing the same and may eat ahead of time or have a snack so I’m not so hungry and want to eat everything.” Blackwood said.

If you are doing the meal-planning, remember that heart healthy items like salmon and tuna are also great for throwing on the grill. Check out this recommended recipe for Grilled Salmon Salad. It’s a quick, easy way to eliminate a lot of fat and calories, but it keeps the favor and variety high. Fresh fruit is a summertime treat and ending with something like Strawberries and Yogurt Sauce is a good way to keep things fresh and lite.

salmon_saladIf healthy grill items are not available, Blackwood says you can always eat the hamburger (mustard and relish are free foods), but without the bun. This leaves carb exchanges for the corn-on-the-cob or potato salad. Pile on the salad fixings and dab a tiny bit of dressing.  Blackwood adds “My brain will look at my plate and say ‘Wow, you have a lot to eat!’”

For more on summer picnic and cook-out ideas, check out “Get Ready for Summer Picnics and Barbecues” from the American Diabetes Association.

DMS offers diabetes self-management and diabetes education services. For more information on specific exercise needs or to enroll in group or individual sessions, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

Contact DMS diabetes educator Elaine Blackwood at EBlackwood@diabetesms.com.

Also see these related items:

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Jul
10

Shrimp Appetizer

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shrimp_app

Shrimp Appetizer

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled, deveined
  • 4 teaspoons cajun seasonings
  • 2 tablespoons garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup white wine
  • 18 leaves fresh basil
  • 2 medium fresh lemons
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions:

Blend together garlic and basil and place in oil. (This can be mixed together ahead of time to allow the flavors to blend). Sauté’ garlic and basil in a skillet for about 1 minute. Add the shrimp and continue to saute’ for 2-3 minutes or until shrimp turns pink. Add seasoning blend (to taste), then add white wine. Allow to simmer for another 1-2 minutes. Immediately before serving, squeeze fresh lemon over shrimp. Serve hot. This can be used as an appetizer or as part of the main course for a meal if served over pasta or rice. Serves 4.

Nutritional value: Calories: 150 – Carbohydrate: 0 grams – Protein: 14 grams – Fat: 5 grams

Nutritional value with 1/3 cup of brown rice: Calories: 222 – Carbohydrate: 15 grams – Protein: 16 grams – Fat: 5.5 grams (1g fiber)

Nutritional value with 1/2 cup of wheat pasta: Calories: 237 – Carbohydrate: 18 grams – Protein: 18 grams – Fat: 5.5 grams (3g fiber)

Categories : Nutrition, Recipes
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Jul
10

Strawberries with Honeyed Yogurt Sauce

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Strawberries with Honeyed Yogurt Sauce

Ingredients:

1 quart fresh strawberries

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt

1 tablespoon orange juice

1 to 2 teaspoons honey

Ground cinnamon

Directions:

Rinse and hull strawberries. Combine yogurt, juice, honey and cinnamon to taste in small bowl; mix well. Serve over berries.

Makes 4 servings.

Dietary exchanges: ½ milk, 1 fruit

Nutritional value: Calories: 88 – Total fat: 1 g – Carbohydrates: 16g – Protein: 4g (4g fiber)

From the book Diabetic Cooking, No-Bake recipes for summer, 2007

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Jul
10

Grilled Salmon Salad

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Grilled Salmon Salad

Ingredients:

1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons fat-free raspberry or balsamic vinaigrette salad dressing, divided

4 skinless salmon filets (4 to 5 ounces each)

½ teaspoon black pepper

¼ teaspoon salt

8 cups mesclun or spring salad greens

2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved if large

¼ cup fresh basil leaves, chopped julienned

Directions:

  1. Prepare charcoal or gas grill or preheat broiler. Brush 2 tablespoons dressing over salmon. Sprinkle with pepper and salt. Grill in covered over medium-high heat or broil without turning 4 inches from heat source 5 to 6 minutes or until salmon turns opaque in center (don’t overcook or salmon will become dry).
  2. While salmon is cooking, combine greens, tomatoes and remaining 1/3 cup dressing in large bowl. Transfer to dinner plantes. Top with salmon and basil.

Makes 4 servings.

Dietary exchanges: 3 lean mean, 2 vegetable, 1 fat

Nutritional value: Calories: 264 – Total fat: 12g – Carbohydrates: 12g – Protein – 24g (3g fiber)

From the book Diabetic Cooking, No-Bake recipes for summer, 2007

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Jul
08

Be cool, safe when exercising with diabetes

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If you are living with diabetes, your exercise needs don’t take a holiday during the summer months. Elaine Blackwood, diabetes educator with Diabetes Management & Supplies, advises taking a few extra steps to prepare for the heat of summer instead of taking a long vacation from physical activity.

heat_exerciseExercising inside or in the water is one way to address the summer heat. Swimming or exercising in water provides great options for people living with diabetes who want to stay fit and cool at the same time. Readers Digest says a water aerobics class may be the best way to get a full-body workout in the pool — and you don’t even need to know how to swim. If there’s upbeat music playing and you’re with a nice group of people, you may even feel a little bit like you’re at a party.

When you take your workout outside or out of the water, take into consideration the temperature and humidity of your region. Chicago and New Orleans may be in the same time zone, but the conditions are often quite different.

The Mayo Clinic cautions that exercising in hot weather puts extra stress on the body and puts you at risk of serious illness. “Both the exercise itself and the air temperature increase your core body temperature,” the clinic explains. “To help cool itself, your body sends more blood to circulate through your skin. This leaves less blood for your muscles, which in turn increases your heart rate. If the humidity also is high, your body faces added stress because sweat doesn’t readily evaporate from your skin. That pushes your body temperature even higher.”

Drink lots of fluids and be on the look-out for these heat-related illnesses:

  • Heat cramps. Heat cramps are painful muscle contractions, mainly affecting the calves, quadriceps and abdominals. Affected muscles may feel firm to the touch. Your body temperature may be normal.
  • Heat exhaustion. With heat exhaustion, your body temperature rises as high as 104 F (40 C) and you may experience nausea, vomiting, headache, fainting, weakness and cold, clammy skin. If left untreated, this can lead to heatstroke.
  • Heatstroke. Heatstroke is a life-threatening emergency condition that occurs when your body temperature is greater than 104 F (40 C). Your skin may be hot, but your body may stop sweating to help cool itself. You may develop confusion and irritability. You should seek immediate medical attention.

The heat illness warning signs include muscle cramps, nausea/vomiting, weakness, headache, dizziness and confusion. For more from the Mayo Clinic, check out Heat and exercise: Keeping cool in hot weather.

If you are living with diabetes or caring for someone with diabetes, it’s important to understand that regular exercise is a part of the prescription for healthier living and you have several choices that let you find the best exercise or combinations of exercise. DMS offers diabetes self-management and diabetes education services. For more information on specific exercise needs or to enroll in group or individual sessions, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

Contact DMS diabetes educator Elaine Blackwood at EBlackwood@diabetesms.com.

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.