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Archive for April, 2013

Apr
30

Beans can unlock better blood sugar control

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rbeansDespite being a starch or carbohydrate, dried beans and lentils are a healthy addition to the diet of people living with diabetes. Unlike a dinner roll, beans pack a one-two punch – fiber and protein – that may help control blood sugar.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) highly recommends bean dishes. “Whether you prefer kidney, pinto, navy or black beans, you can’t find better nutrition than that provided by beans,” the ADA says. “They are very high in fiber giving you about 1/3 of your daily requirement in just a ½ cup and are also good sources of magnesium, and potassium. “They are considered starchy vegetables but a ½ cup provides as much protein as an ounce of meat without the saturated fat.”

If you cook with canned beans, the ADA recommends draining and rinsing the beans to get rid of as much sodium as possible.

Unlike regular starchy food, fiber-rich food is handled differently when digested. Part of the fiber passes through the digestive system intact. This difference means that eating foods rich in fiber is less likely to cause a spike in high blood sugar.

The second advantage is the fact that beans are a rich source of protein. A cup of beans, like the ones pictured, contains about 16 grams of protein, the same as 2 ounces of meat or chicken. Beans also contain no cholesterol and no more than 1 gram of fat – never saturated!

Here are some tips for preparing dried beans:

  • Eliminate some of the intestinal distress by soaking the beans before cooking. Recommended techniques include soaking in plain water or putting a 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, lemon juice or liquid whey. Soak them overnight or as long as you can and rinse off anything that raises to the top of the water.
  • Season with apple cider vinegar instead of hot sauce to control both spicy burn and added salt.
  • Make your beans a “complete protein” source by complementing them with, for example, low-fat ham, turkey sausage or brown rice.
  • Add lentils to soups and salads to make those dishes more hearty and filling.
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Apr
24

MLB hero has faith-based response to diabetes

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When Lou Brock played Major League Baseball, stealing was one of his specialties. Now that the stolen bases record-holder has retired, he helps people restore the health and hope that has been taken from them. Brock, a minister and motivational speaker, will be the featured speaker tonight, April 24, at Higher Ground Outreach Church in Baton Rouge. A representative of Diabetes Management & Supplies will be on hand and participate in the event. If you are not in Baton Rouge tonight, you can still participate in a live broadcast starting at about 7 p.m.  The live broadcast will be available via UStream: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/higher-ground-outreach-ministries-baton-rouge.

Brock was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 60. He now works with Novo Nordisk, an international pharmaceutical company, to promote awareness and encourage tight, proactive management of diabetes.

Area family medicine physician, Dr. Rani Whitfield will introduce Brock and provide some background into the diabetes epidemic gripping the country. He will discuss prevention, diagnosis and risk factors that can increase a person’s chances of developing diabetes.

Both Brock and Whitfield are products of Southern University in Baton Rouge. Brock, a native of El Dorado, Ark., grew up on a share cropping cotton plantation in Collinston, La. He started Southern on an academic scholarship and later tried out and made the baseball team. His star began to rise on the Southern diamond and continued to shine as he stole bases and captured records. His 20-year professional career spanned three years with the Chicago Cubs and 17 years with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Whitfield, a board certified family physician and sports medicine specialist, has become known as “Tha Hip Hop Doc” or “H2D” to many in Baton Rouge and across the country. Whitfield is an impassioned advocate for increasing the awareness of health-related issues, including HIV/AIDS, obesity, cardiovascular disease and substance abuse.

Higher Ground Outreach Church, led by Bishop Rickey and Pastor Lesia Washington, is located at 3730 N. Sherwood Forest in Baton Rouge. The event starts at 6:30 p.m. tonight.

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Apr
19

Online order requests aid diabetes control

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DMS_orderDiabetes Management & Supplies, your partner in proactive diabetes control, has recently added an online order form to help make the task of ordering testing and medication supplies easier.  The DMS products section contains an extensive catalog of the industry’s top products and supplies including all major insulin pumps, blood sugar testing supplies and continuous glucose monitoring devices.

After visiting the products section of the Web site or after consult with your physician to learn your specific need, you can click on the DMS “Order Supplies Here” graphic to access a form that will get your medical and contact information and give you an opportunity to list the supplies or products you need. When you complete the form, the DMS customer service department takes care of getting the needed documentation or prescriptions from your physician. They will make phone contact with you and insure that the needed supplies are quickly mailed to your door. You can also request regular shipments when your supplies need replenishing.

As our understanding of diabetes increases, people living with diabetes are being given an expanded tool box of products and devices that can be used for treatment and daily management. Insulin pumps have been used since the 1970s. So, as a category, they are not new. They have, however, increased in popularity as the technology associated with them has evolved. Insulin delivery through a pump is popular with people with extremely busy lifestyles and the pumps may provide a more stable, consistent blood sugar control.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), offers an Insulin Pump 101 for those new to pumping and as an update on the latest features of the new class of insulin pumps. The pump parts and associated terminology are explained.

Diabetes Management & Supplies also offers a survey tool that can assist in helping to determine what tools and products are best for you. Visit Diabetes Management & Supplies or click HERE to take the brief survey to learn more about options for monitoring and medication delivery.

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Apr
18

Neuropathy a complication of diabetes

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woman_testingOnce a diagnosis of diabetes has been given, avoiding complications is a prime objective. Diabetic neuropathy is a group of complications that gets a lot of attention because it involves nerve damage and the limbs of the body.

People living with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. This damage can be silent, showing now signs, or it can cause pain, tingling, or numbness-loss of feeling-in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs.

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC), an arm of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, explains  symptoms can be mild at first. Because most nerve damage occurs over several years, mild cases may go unnoticed for a long time.

Symptoms of nerve damage include:

  • Numbness, tingling, or pain in the toes, feet, legs, hands, arms, and fingers
  • Wasting of the muscles of the feet or hands
  • Indigestion, nausea, or vomiting
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Dizziness or faintness due to a drop in blood pressure after standing or sitting up
  • Problems with urination
  • Erectile dysfunction in men or vaginal dryness in women
  • General body weakness

Diabetes Self-Management services, like those offered by Diabetes Management & Supplies, may help avoid complications like nerve damage and encourage good blood sugar control. The DMS Diabetes education program is accredited by American Association of Diabetes Educator’s Diabetes Education Accreditation Program (DEAP).  This accreditation means that it meets the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management. Visit the DMS site or call 1-866-734-7164 to speak to the education team.

For more from the NDIC, visit Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

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Apr
17

Survey views insulin delivery, monitoring needs

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profile_survey_0Blood sugar control is not “one-size-fits-all,” so a variety of products and supplies are available to help each person find a perfect fit when it comes to medication and monitoring. Diabetes Management & Supplies offers a survey tool that can assist in helping to determine what tools and products are best for you.

As our understanding of diabetes increases, people living with diabetes are being given an expanded tool box of products and devices that can be used for treatment and daily management. Insulin pumps have been used since the 70s so as a category they are not new. They have, however, increased in popularity as the technology associated with them has evolved. Insulin delivery through a pump is popular with people with extremely busy lifestyles and the pumps may provide a more stable, consistent blood sugar control.

cgm_200The American Diabetes Association (ADA), offers an Insulin Pump 101 for those new to pumping and as an update on the latest features of the new class of insulin pumps. The pump parts and associated terminology are explained.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) isn’t mandatory when using an insulin pump, but CGMs and insulin pumps are being lauded as the “dynamic duo” of blood sugar control. A CGM automatically takes several blood sugar readings throughout the day, sends alerts for extreme readings and feeds those levels to the insulin pump. The goal would be blood sugar control that is consistently stable.

The CGM reads blood sugar levels every one to five minutes and shows whether a person’s blood sugar is rising or falling. Combining CGM with pump therapy can provide a method to monitor and manage blood glucose levels. The information obtained can also help to fine-tune the pump settings.

Visit the Diabetes Management & Supplies Products section or click on the box above to take the brief survey to learn more about options for monitoring and medication delivery.

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Apr
01

Amount of sleep can factor into diabetes control

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sleepMost people know that sleep patterns can impact blood pressure, weight gain and other health functions, but people living with diabetes maybe surprised to learn sleep habits can also affect blood sugar control.

A recent study found that sleep extremes – too much or not enough – can spark higher A1C readings.  The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well a person’s diabetes has been controlled over a three-month period. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c.

Japanese researchers identified a “U-shaped association” in the sleep extremes and A1C levels. Subjects with short (less than 4.5 hours) or long (greater than 8.5 hours) sleep duration had higher A1C levels compared with subjects sleeping for 6.5 to 7.4 hours, indicating a U-shaped association.

The association of sleep duration with obesity and A1C levels was observed to be U-shaped even after adjustments for various confounding variables. Other sleep issues often facing people with diabetes include sleep apnea, nighttime lows in blood sugar and neuropathy and leg pain.

For more on the study’s findings, visit Physician Briefing.

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.