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Archive for November, 2012

Nov
16

Side note: Planning a healthy Thanksgiving meal

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The need for good health doesn’t take a holiday, but it is much easier to overlook nutritional advice or doctor’s orders during the big “eating holidays” because it’s a part of the fun and “everybody is doing it.”

Diabetics and those trying to avoid diabetes may be best served by putting some thoughtful planning into the Thanksgiving Day spread or remembering to prepare something healthy in case you are faced with three variations of Fried Mac and Cheese.

Diabetic-friendly side dishes are a great way to fill you and your plate while giving you an alternative to the usual carb-heavy holiday fare. Chef John Wright has some suggestions for a Thanksgiving without post-meal regrets.

Check out these recipes from the Eating Wright archives:

Check back for more recipe suggestions as we approach Thanksgiving Day.

Categories : Uncategorized
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Nov
16

Braised Cabbage with Apples

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Braised Cabbage with Apples

Ingredients:

  • 1 head of cabbage, chopped
  • 1 white onion, diced
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled & diced
  • 1 cup Apple juice
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Directions:

Place olive oil in a pan & heat. Add garlic & onions, saute until soft, about 8 minutes. Add chopped cabbage, salt & pepper and cook for an additional 8 minutes. Add apple juice and water then cover with lid tightly. After 10 minutes, add diced apples and cook for an additional 10 minutes with the lid tightly in place. Stir and serve.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Recipe yields 5 cups, serving size 1 cup 9 grams fat per serving 139 calories per serving 14 grams carbohydrates per serving

Categories : Recipes
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Nov
16

Balsamic Green Beans

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Balsamic Green Beans

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fresh green beans, washed and stemmed
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • Salt and pepper

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Saute garlic and onions in pan in 2 Tbsp. olive oil. Add green beans, garlic and onions to roasting pan. Add balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Recipe yields 6 servings, serving size 3/4 cup 90 calories per serving 6 grams fat per serving 10 grams of carbohydrates per serving

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Nov
16

Healthy Mac and Cheese

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Healthy Mac and Cheese

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups cooked elbow macaroni
  • 4 ounces Velveeta Light Cheese
  • ¾ cup 1% lowfat milk
  • ½ cup Reduced fat cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1 egg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper

Directions:

In a small bowl, beat egg and mix in milk and white pepper. Cut Velveeta Cheese into small cubes. After cooking macaroni, drain well and return to pot to keep warm; stir in Velveeta and allow to melt. Gradually stir in milk mixture and shredded cheese. Pour into a 2-quart casserole dish coated with non-stick cooking spray and bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until bubbly.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Yield: 4 servings Serving size: ½ cup Total calories: 230 Sodium: 589 milligrams Total fat: 8 grams Protein: 16 grams Saturated fat: 4.5 grams Carbohydrate: 24 grams Cholesterol: 75 milligrams Diabetic exchanges: 1 starch, ½ milk and 1 medium fat meat * This recipe saves you close to 200 calories per serving from regular Mac and Cheese.

Categories : Recipes
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Nov
14

World Diabetes Day a global call to action

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Today is World Diabetes Day, but don’t expect balloons and a celebration. World Diabetes Day is a call to action for individuals, healthcare providers and policy-makers who all need to educate themselves on the disease, promote effective diabetes management and aggressive diabetes prevention when possible.

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 346 million people worldwide have diabetes. This number is likely to more than double by 2030 without intervention. Almost 80 percent of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

World Diabetes Day raises global awareness of diabetes, its spread around the world and prevention steps. The global focus, started by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and WHO, is celebrated on 14 November to mark the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best, was instrumental in the discovery of insulin in 1922, a life-saving treatment for diabetics.

For more on World Diabetes Day

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The term diabetes can be used to describe a host of conditions that include type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Not all forms of diabetes are preventable, but studies show individuals can greatly reduce their likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes with healthy lifestyle interventions.

The Learning Center of Diabetes Management and Supplies explains that type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 – 95 percent of all cases. It used to be called adult-onset diabetes, but, unfortunately, both children and adults develop this kind of diabetes. Many people think of it as the kind of diabetes that does not require insulin. However, about half of people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need insulin. This is because the pancreas produces less and less insulin over time, so it must be injected to meet the body’s needs.

There is good news though: Studies have shown that many people who have pre-diabetes can prevent or slow down the onset of full-blown diabetes by losing weight and adding regular physical activity into their routines.

U.S. News and World Report offers some steps that might help you avoid diabetes. These include properly timed meals, getting more exercise and increasing fiber in your diet.

Visit U.S. News health section for seven keys to avoiding diabetes.

Nov
09

Prevention still option after pre-diabetes start

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If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you can take a “wait-and-see” approach to developing type 2 diabetes or you can become proactive in your attempts to prevent your condition form developing into diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association explains that before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have pre-diabetes — blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Recent research has shown that some long-term damage to the body, especially the heart and circulatory system, may already be occurring during pre-diabetes.

The good news is there are things you can do to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Management and Supplies Learning Center contains a discussion on pre-diabetes and the lifestyle changes that can help you prevent diabetes. Commitments to diet and exercise changes are very good starts.

Visit the DMS Learning Center and the ADA for more on pre-diabetes.

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Nov
07

Celebrate National Eating Healthy Day

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The American Heart Association is celebrating National Eating Healthy Day today. It’s a day to raise awareness about making healthy food choices and to incorporate nutritious foods in your diet.

As part of this effort, everyone is encouraged to add fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to their diet rather than some of the items high in salt and sugar.

The American Heart Association is providing some pretty alarming statistics. More than 60 percent of adults in the U.S. today are overweight or obese. One in three American kids and teenagers is overweight or obese. And heart disease and stroke are America’s number one and number four killers.

Visit the AHA’s Nutrition Center for more on healthy eating.

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Nov
07

Health Net joins effort to impact diabetes rates

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Health Net, a health services and medical information company, is providing the public with information on how to help prevent diabetes and how to help live an active lifestyle after being diagnosed with the condition.

“Unlike type 1, steps can be taken to reduce the risks of developing type 2 diabetes,” said Jonathan Scheff, M.D., chief medical officer for Health Net. “Prevention is significant because diabetes can cause serious medical issues, including heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, amputation and nerve damage.”

Visit Daily Finance for more on National Diabetes Awareness month and the Health Net initiatives.

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Nov
06

Pasta, whole grains have place in healthy plate

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You might think pasta and diabetes don’t mix, but Chef John Wright can excite all the senses while also promoting good dietary practices for diabetics. Chef Wright provided a live Pasta Jambalaya cooking demonstration during the New Orleans Step Out to Stop Diabetes walk and showed how whole wheat pasta, lean protein and fresh produce can yield a dish that’s good and good for you.

The American Diabetes Association explains that it is a common myth that diabetics can only eat small amounts of starchy foods such as bread, potatoes and pasta. In the ADA’s Diabetes Myth guide, it is explained that starchy foods are a part of a healthy meal plan.

What is important is the portion size. Whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes, yams, peas and corn can be included in your meals and snacks. The key is portions. For most people with diabetes, having 3-4 servings of carbohydrate-containing foods per meal is about right. Whole grain starchy foods are also a good source of fiber, which helps keep your digestive system healthy.

Check out this post for Chef John Wright Pasta Jambalaya recipe!

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.