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Cynthia Pazos, President & CEO, Diabetes Management & Supplies - Recipient of a 2018 CityBusiness Woman of the Year Award

Cynthia Pazos, President & CEO, Diabetes Management & Supplies – Recipient of a 2018 CityBusiness Woman of the Year Award

New Orleans, LA – November 9, 2018 - As President & CEO of Diabetes Management and Supplies  (DMS), Cynthia Pazos has made her passion for helping diabetics and their families a personal and professional goal. After 20 years working in the healthcare industry providing medical supplies and educational resources to more than 60,000 patients, she and her team of 70 employees remain committed to ensuring that people struggling with the disease can have a good quality of life.

Last August, Pazos was honored by New Orleans CityBusiness Magazine as an inductee into the 20th class of Women of the Year recipients. This recognition was designed to celebrate business women who have demonstrated exceptional professional achievements and community impact. On November 2nd, CityBusiness hosted the Women of the Year Luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in New Orleans. Pazos, supported by her friends, family and colleagues, received an on-stage recognition and award for her accomplishments.

Pazos launched Diabetes Management & Supplies in 1997. Her vision for the company was shaped by watching a family member’s struggle with Type 2 diabetes and learning about the disease during her career as a medical sales representative. Today, DMS provides pump supplies, continuous glucose monitors, orthopedic shoes, test strips and other home health equipment to patients across the U.S.

“I can still remember one of the calls I received about the discontinued insulin my family member was prescribed. Unfortunately, that was one of the several times where I felt they were not receiving the proper care they deserved,” Pazos said. “I quickly learned that diabetes patients need a strong support system, on-going medical supplies, knowledge about dietary management, and access to new tools that will help them control their illness and have a good quality of life.”

In 2005, Pazos founded The Buddy Stall Diabetes Learning Center. She has served as a local American Diabetes Association board member and walk chair and initiated the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Sneaker Sale program with the local Walgreens management team whose fundraising success grew into a national program.

A Cabrini High School alum, she is the chairperson for the school’s “Continuing Her Legacy” capital campaign, and formerly served as the chair of the “Alumnae Giving” drive. Each year she hosts a “Generosity In Giving” luncheon to continue to develop the philanthropy spirit for Cabrini’s alumnae. In addition, Pazos supports local entrepreneurs and the culinary arts as a board member for Sucré, a sweet boutique in New Orleans that specialize in gourmet candies. “If a cause is near and dear to me, I am passionate about it,” said Pazos. “I am honored to work with other community leaders in making a difference in every way I can.”

Her commitment to improving the health of diabetics is demonstrated in her continued interest in bringing the latest self-management technological and educational tools to the forefront. She believes that new technologies have changed how people manage diabetes and work diligently to supply patients with new healthcare devices like the continuous glucose monitor that allows diabetics to know their blood glucose without having to do finger sticks.

After years of service in the community, the CityBusiness’ recognition was a humbling experience for the healthcare leader.

“It is an honor to be recognized as a woman business owner by CityBusiness,” said Pazos. “The publication has been an integral part of our business community. It gives us a platform in which to grow and share our accomplishments.  Without their weekly publication, those of us in business would not have the knowledge of what our city and state businesses are accomplishing to support our local and national communities.  We are truly grateful to have their support as we strive to create jobs, services, and support in our industries.”

To learn more about DMS, visit www.diabetesms.com.

 

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Jan
10

What is CGM?

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Continuous Glucose Monitoring or CGM is a wireless device worn on our abdomen that provides glucose readings every five minutes. This generates 288 readings a day. You still need to check your blood glucose two times daily to make sure the monitor is working correctly, but a CGM provides valuable information for people who have wide swings in their blood sugars or who has A1c values that don’t match their blood sugar meter results.

Dexcom_Graph

You should also think of a Blood Glucose Strip as a picture and a CGM as a video in-motion. With a CGM you will find solutions to many of these common challenges:

  • Privacy in checking your blood sugar levels while at a restaurant or in a meeting.
  •  Do you have children or grandchildren you are constantly worried about their blood glucose during the day or night?
  • Are you concerned about Dawn Phenomenon?
  • Have you ever had hypoglycemic unawareness?
  • Are you abut to get behind the wheel? Is your blood sugar going up or down?

Click here to take a short survey to see if continuous glucose monitoring will benefit you.

 For more information concerning the CGM and other questions you have please call us at 1-888-738-7929.

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Oct
06

Flu season precautions start in October

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flu-seasonThe Influenza Season should raise caution flags for both adults and children living with diabetes. Persons who are Type 1 or Type 2 are not more likely to catch the flu, but they are at a higher risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Complications that can develop from the flu include pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections.

The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control blood sugar. The illness might raise sugars, but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines  for people with diabetes.

Everyone 6 months and older should get a yearly flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible, but getting vaccinated later is OK. Vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some children who have received flu vaccine previously and children who have only received one dose in their lifetime, may need two doses of flu vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help educate and prepare individuals for the challenges of diabetes. For more information on the DMS diabetes education services, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

Related: Nasal sprays, FluMist out this year

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Oct
06

Alert: Nasal sprays, FluMist out this year

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Nasal sprays used in the past to prevent the spread of influenza should not be an option for the 2016-17 flu season.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is only recommending the use of injectable influenza vaccines this year.

The category of injectable vaccines includes inactivated influenza vaccines and recombinant influenza vaccines. The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2016-2017.

The nasal spray version of the flu vaccine was very popular with parents and pediatricians because many children are afraid of needles. This year, however, the nation’s leading pediatrics group is leaning to the side of caution.

In a policy statement recently released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the group recommended children over six months old receive the flu shot rather than the FluMist vaccine, which federal health officials have recently discovered was not effective in preventing the flu during the past three seasons. About a third of children who are vaccinated against the flu each year receive FluMist.

Everyone 6 months and older should get a yearly flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible, but getting vaccinated later is OK. Vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some children who have received flu vaccine previously and children who have only received one dose in their lifetime, may need two doses of flu vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help educate and prepare individuals for the challenges of diabetes. For more information on the DMS diabetes education services, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

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Apr
06

Glucose control key in avoiding kidney damage

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Good blood sugar control today will reduce the risk of damage to kidneys and other organs tomorrow.

kidney_chartThe kidneys filter waste products from your blood and keep fluids in your body balanced. Having diabetes puts you at a greater risk for developing kidney disease also called diabetic nephropathy. This complication is also called diabetic kidney disease. It is a progressive kidney disease caused by damage to the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys that are used to filter waste from the blood.

High blood glucose, sometimes paired with high blood pressure, slowly damages the kidneys. High blood sugar makes the kidneys filter too much blood. All this extra work is hard on the filters. After many years, they start to leak and useful protein is lost in the urine.

People living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes can experience kidney complications. Chronic hyperglycemia, excess blood sugar, is the primary cause of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, hyperglycemia starts in the first decades of life and is usually the only recognized cause of nephropathy. With type 2 diabetes, to the contrary, hyperglycemia starts near middle-age, usually when the kidneys have already suffered the long‐term consequences of aging and of other recognized promoters of chronic renal injury such as arterial hypertension, obesity, high cholesterol, and smoking.

Early detection of kidney damage is important, but there might not be noticeable symptoms in the early stages. It’s important to have regular urine tests to find kidney damage early because early kidney damage might be reversed.

Later in the progression, swelling in your body is a primary symptom. The feet and legs are key areas where swelling will be seen as kidneys become damaged.

Keeping blood sugar as close to normal as possible is the first step to preventing kidney disease. Control your blood pressure by checking it on a regular basis and following your doctor’s recommendations for acceptable levels. Finally, don’t use tobacco because it narrows your blood vessels including the already tiny ones working deep inside your kidneys.

Educating individuals on best ways to avoid this and other diabetes complications is a goal of self-management courses. If you need help developing a strategy to avoid complications or face other challenges, Diabetes Management & Supplies can assist with diabetes self-management and education services. For more information, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

Mar
23

Hitting the road: Have pump, CGM will travel!

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one_touch_chartWhether you have already planned a summer vacation or still in the process, incorporate your pump or CGM needs into your travel plans instead of treating your needs as an afterthought or an overwhelming fear. There’s nothing new under the sun and you can also reap the benefits of those who have traveled the vacation path before you.

Flying through the screening process? You don’t have to encounter problems passing through security at an airport. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has a helpline number to assist patients with medical conditions who want to prepare for the screening process prior to flying. Call TSA Cares toll free at 1-855-787-2227.

You can obtain a Transportation Security Administration Card to print out and bring with you to notify TSA of your diabetes can be found online.  If you have concerns about wearing an insulin pump or CGMS through scanners, contact the manufacturer of your medical device.

Tips for traveling while wearing an Insulin Pump or CGM

  • Always have Plan B in place in case something goes wrong with your current device, such as carrying syringes or pens to give injections and carrying extra supplies in case you run low.
  • Be sure to carry some form of prescription or letter from your physician that treats you for your diabetes.
  • Carry all of your medicines, such as insulin, and all related supplies in your carry-on baggage. Be sure to place these items in a clear plastic bag that is labeled. It will help to remove this bag from your luggage so that the TSA officials can clearly see what is inside. Also, in case your checked luggage is lost, you will still have your insulin and supplies with you in your carry-on bag.
  • If you wear an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring device, it is OK to continue to keep them on as you go through security at airports or terminals. The scanners will not harm these devices in anyway. Please notify the TSA officials as you move through the checkpoints that you are wearing a pump or CGM. Usually, the TSA official will pull you to the side and do a more thorough search of the device, such as swabbing the pump or monitor and/or your hands.

A printed checklist might help elevate stress and keep your plan in your hands, front and center. Medtronic, an industry leader in insulin delivery systems, has a downloadable checklist for traveling with a pump and/or CGM. Click HERE for a copy.

Learning how to handle life’s challenges like traveling and treatment plans is a covered topic in diabetes self-management courses. If you need help developing life and treatment strategies, Diabetes Management & Supplies can assist with diabetes self-management and education services. For more information, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

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Feb
09

Goals can pack more punch than resolutions

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SMART-goals

The start of each year is a prime time to consider your life, health and ways to improve both. Motivation and method are both key to setting new goals and ending your year with a sense of accomplishment.

Good health is important, but it will not just happen. SMART Goals provide a road map to success because those goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely.

Diabetes is often a numbers game: blood sugar level, A1C, weight, etc. Beyond those faceless figures, one should focus on goals that bolster your diabetes control. “I want to lower my A1C to 7, but ‘why?’”

If you want to accomplish a task, you set a plan, you set deadlines and you take action. Most people are familiar with SMART goals in the workplace, but they also apply to health. For example, let’s say you wanted to an A1C of 7.5, but your level is now 11. It would be unrealistic to say you wanted reduce your A1C to 11 in next month.

It would be more realistic to set up a SMART goal:

  • Specific – I will decrease my average fasting blood sugar by 2 points each week.
  • Measureable – I will keep track of blood sugar levels three times daily so I can track my
    progress towards my goal.
  • Attainable – Is the goal attainable for me? Your diabetes care team should be consulted about ways to reduce your A1C and risk of complications.
  • Realistic – Is the goal realistic for me? Lowering one’s blood sugar is a great goal, but drastic drops can increase changes of hyperglycemia.
  • Timely – I will make an appointment with my care team every three months in 2016 to evaluate my A1C with hopes to start 2017 near 7.5.

Other goals that will impact blood sugar control include getting regular and sufficient exercise, gaining or losing weight, following a diabetes nutrition plan, and being more compliant to medication schedules.

Need help turning your goals into a viable game plan? Diabetes Management & Supplies offers diabetes self-management and diabetes education services. For more information on specific needs or to enroll in group or individual sessions, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

The National Diabetes Education Program, a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offers an online resource for making a plan for success. Visit Diabetes Health Sense and make your plan today!

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Feb
01

Monitoring: It’s a numbers game you can win!

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susan_testing

Blood sugar levels are tested in your doctor’s office, but that is not enough. Blood sugar changes not only from day to day. It changes from hour to hour. Some people run high in the morning and others at night. Certain foods might cause a spike. A long walk may drop levels too low.

Glucose monitors are machines that measure blood sugar from finger sticks. Continuous glucose monitors are worn on the body. They records several readings a day without finger sticks.

Why test your blood sugar?

  • Tell how well you’re reaching health goals
  • Know how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels
  • Know how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels
  • See the effect of diabetes drugs on blood sugar levels
  • Know when blood sugars are too high or low

To get a full picture of your diabetes, you need regular monitoring. Testing often will show problem areas and how your levels react to certain foods. A blood sugar reading might be an early warning sign in sudden illness.

Another method of monitoring blood glucose is Continuous Glucose Monitoring or CGM. A CGM automatically takes several blood sugar readings throughout the day, sends alerts for extreme readings and feeds those levels to the insulin pump. The goal would be blood sugar control that is consistently stable.

The CGM reads blood sugar levels every one to five minutes and shows whether a person’s blood sugar is rising or falling. Combining CGM with insulin pump therapy can provide a method to monitor and manage blood glucose levels. The information obtained can also help to fine-tune the pump settings.

The American Heart Association offers these tools to help you understand the importance of monitoring and staying as healthy as possible:

  • Diabetes-Friendly Recipes. Recipes to satisfy cravings – sweet, savory or somewhere in between.
  • My Diabetes Health Assessment. Having type 2 diabetes greatly increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Learn your 10-year risk and ways you can lower it.
  • Diabetes Quiz. Take this short quiz to learn the facts about diabetes.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help take the guess-work out of your monitoring needs. For more information on specific monitoring or insulin delivery needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

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Jan
06

Staying equipped key to ‘healthier you’ in 2016

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Insulin pumps and Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices work best when insertion sites and parts and accessories are changed as recommended. Resolving to make “a healthier you” in 2016 can start with a good understanding of your device and its disposal parts and ensuring you are always equipped with adequate supplies.

infusionInsertion site management refers to choosing the best locations on your body to place insertion sets and sensors, but it also involves the frequency in which the site is changed and new supplies are put in place.

John Wright, Diabetes Management & Supplies Director of Sales, wears an insulin pump and stresses that site management can affect the level of blood sugar control. “It is most important with insulin pumps as the infusion set is infusing insulin,” he explains.  “The CGM, however, doesn’t affect the blood glucose as much if the patient wears it for longer.”

Insulin pump wearers will experience poorer blood sugar control when a site has been used too long before rotation.

It is recommended that CGM sensors be changed every six to seven days, but infusion sets should be changed every two to three days. For the best site locations and interval times, consult your doctor.

Infusion set placement should avoid the following areas:

  • Into the 2-inch (5.0 cm) area around your belly button
  • Where your body naturally bends a great deal
  • In areas where clothing might cause irritation (for example your beltline)
  • Where you have scarred or hardened tissue or stretch marks

cartridge_web-(1)Insulin pump use will require supplies that include insertion sets, reservoirs, tubing, cartridge caps, batteries, dressings and adhesives. This list varies depending on the individual users and the brand of pump.

CGM devices will require supplies that include sensors, receivers, transmitters and batteries.

To ensure the best results, keep an eye on your supplies on hand and always place reorders enough in advance that you don’t run out of supplies or over use your insertion sites. Click HERE for our efficient reorder form or call 1-888-738-7929 to place an order by phone.

 

Categories : Our Services, Supplies
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Oct
01

Stay equipped for diabetes treatment plan

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a1c_meal
A diabetes treatment plan is your strategy to stay on top of your health. Monitoring your blood sugar, tracking and taking drugs are crucial. The directions are given, but they must be carried out to improve your condition. You may have many medical professionals, but you complete the team.

Here are some things you can do to take charge of your health:

  • Follow healthy meal plans that are best for your unique needs
  • Keep up with your medications and store them correctly
  • Take your insulin or other medications as instructed
  • Monitor and test your blood sugar as directed
  • Keep good records of your blood sugar readings
  • Share those readings with your doctor or diabetes educator

You may have learned already the basics about drugs and testing. Now is a good time to ask specific questions about your treatment plan. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan’s success. This is where we can help. Make sure you don’t run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don’t run out of medication. Learn more: Diabetes treatment plan a road map to success.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

  • Call us at 1-888-738-7929
  • Email customerservice@diabetesms.com
  • Click to fill out an Order Form

We value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is good health.

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.