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Archive for Supplies

Mar
10

Later flu season shines light on sick-day prep

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flu-seasonAlthough the calendar says the influenza season should be over, cases of the flu are increasing into March 2016 instead of winding down to a close. Avoiding illness is a prime goal, but people living with diabetes should be aware of the special needs presented by sick days caused by the flu and other conditions.

The blood sugar targets for a sick day are the same as other days. A blood sugar reading over 180 mg/Dl is still a high blood sugar. The purpose of a sick day management plan and more vigilant testing has to do with limiting hyperglycemia and dehydration. The goals are to prevent DKA in the Type 1, avoid dehydration of the Type 2 individual and avoid potential hospitalizations for either individual.

A sick day plan should include these elements of good blood sugar control.  Monitoring, meals and medications are key while exercise or physical activity is usually halted during the illness.

The sick individual needs to follow a schedule for monitoring that gives the diabetes care team information to direct the modifications for the patient’s needs. Meals and eating will play an important role as medication will need to be adjusted to match rising or falling blood sugar levels. Medications are to be taken on the usual schedule or may be modified to meet the patient’s needs by the doctor or a member of the healthcare team.

Recording temperature, blood sugar, medication amount and time, fluid and food intake and the presence of ketones are highly important on sick days. This log or report will give insight to the diabetes care team of current health status and allow them to help adjust medication or intake to prevent dehydration or ketoacidosis.

The individual with diabetes or the parent/ care giver of the child with diabetes should be proactive in assessing conditions during an illness. Certain foods, testing equipment and testing supplies need to be handy before a sickness occurs.  The phone number of the doctor or diabetes care team should be readily available.

A log to monitor the sickness over time, glucose meter, lancets, lancing device, test strips, control solution, and a bottle of Ketostix should be included in a sick day management tool kit. The food pantry should contain: broth, both sugar-free and regular Jello, both diet and non-diet soft drinks, both sugar-free and regular popsicles, both thin and creamy soups, regular and sugar free pudding, yogurt, juice and milk.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that across the country, this flu season was significantly less severe than in the last few years, though number of cases have been increasing since early January.

Did you know the CDC tracks the flu like a hurricane? Visit CDC Flu Central for current reports, maps and alerts.

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Feb
01

Monitoring: It’s a numbers game you can win!

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Blood sugar levels are tested in your doctor’s office, but that is not enough. Blood sugar changes not only from day to day. It changes from hour to hour. Some people run high in the morning and others at night. Certain foods might cause a spike. A long walk may drop levels too low.

Glucose monitors are machines that measure blood sugar from finger sticks. Continuous glucose monitors are worn on the body. They records several readings a day without finger sticks.

Why test your blood sugar?

  • Tell how well you’re reaching health goals
  • Know how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels
  • Know how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels
  • See the effect of diabetes drugs on blood sugar levels
  • Know when blood sugars are too high or low

To get a full picture of your diabetes, you need regular monitoring. Testing often will show problem areas and how your levels react to certain foods. A blood sugar reading might be an early warning sign in sudden illness.

Another method of monitoring blood glucose is Continuous Glucose Monitoring or CGM. A CGM automatically takes several blood sugar readings throughout the day, sends alerts for extreme readings and feeds those levels to the insulin pump. The goal would be blood sugar control that is consistently stable.

The CGM reads blood sugar levels every one to five minutes and shows whether a person’s blood sugar is rising or falling. Combining CGM with insulin pump therapy can provide a method to monitor and manage blood glucose levels. The information obtained can also help to fine-tune the pump settings.

The American Heart Association offers these tools to help you understand the importance of monitoring and staying as healthy as possible:

  • Diabetes-Friendly Recipes. Recipes to satisfy cravings – sweet, savory or somewhere in between.
  • My Diabetes Health Assessment. Having type 2 diabetes greatly increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Learn your 10-year risk and ways you can lower it.
  • Diabetes Quiz. Take this short quiz to learn the facts about diabetes.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help take the guess-work out of your monitoring needs. For more information on specific monitoring or insulin delivery needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

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Jan
06

Staying equipped key to ‘healthier you’ in 2016

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Insulin pumps and Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices work best when insertion sites and parts and accessories are changed as recommended. Resolving to make “a healthier you” in 2016 can start with a good understanding of your device and its disposal parts and ensuring you are always equipped with adequate supplies.

infusionInsertion site management refers to choosing the best locations on your body to place insertion sets and sensors, but it also involves the frequency in which the site is changed and new supplies are put in place.

John Wright, Diabetes Management & Supplies Director of Sales, wears an insulin pump and stresses that site management can affect the level of blood sugar control. “It is most important with insulin pumps as the infusion set is infusing insulin,” he explains.  “The CGM, however, doesn’t affect the blood glucose as much if the patient wears it for longer.”

Insulin pump wearers will experience poorer blood sugar control when a site has been used too long before rotation.

It is recommended that CGM sensors be changed every six to seven days, but infusion sets should be changed every two to three days. For the best site locations and interval times, consult your doctor.

Infusion set placement should avoid the following areas:

  • Into the 2-inch (5.0 cm) area around your belly button
  • Where your body naturally bends a great deal
  • In areas where clothing might cause irritation (for example your beltline)
  • Where you have scarred or hardened tissue or stretch marks

cartridge_web-(1)Insulin pump use will require supplies that include insertion sets, reservoirs, tubing, cartridge caps, batteries, dressings and adhesives. This list varies depending on the individual users and the brand of pump.

CGM devices will require supplies that include sensors, receivers, transmitters and batteries.

To ensure the best results, keep an eye on your supplies on hand and always place reorders enough in advance that you don’t run out of supplies or over use your insertion sites. Click HERE for our efficient reorder form or call 1-888-738-7929 to place an order by phone.

 

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Oct
01

Stay equipped for diabetes treatment plan

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A diabetes treatment plan is your strategy to stay on top of your health. Monitoring your blood sugar, tracking and taking drugs are crucial. The directions are given, but they must be carried out to improve your condition. You may have many medical professionals, but you complete the team.

Here are some things you can do to take charge of your health:

  • Follow healthy meal plans that are best for your unique needs
  • Keep up with your medications and store them correctly
  • Take your insulin or other medications as instructed
  • Monitor and test your blood sugar as directed
  • Keep good records of your blood sugar readings
  • Share those readings with your doctor or diabetes educator

You may have learned already the basics about drugs and testing. Now is a good time to ask specific questions about your treatment plan. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan’s success. This is where we can help. Make sure you don’t run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don’t run out of medication. Learn more: Diabetes treatment plan a road map to success.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

  • Call us at 1-888-738-7929
  • Email customerservice@diabetesms.com
  • Click to fill out an Order Form

We value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is good health.

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Jan
20

This is a test: Best repeated tomorrow!

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0127-accu-chek-aviva-meterPeople living with diabetes are given a host of numbers in reports from their doctor’s visits. Those numbers are very important, but should be paired with the information that can be gained every day through home monitoring of blood sugar.

Blood sugar testing is very important because it helps you manage your diabetes on a day-to-day basis. Blood sugar numbers help you to understand and take control of your diabetes.

Tools used at home to test and monitor blood sugar levels include blood glucose meters and Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices. Speaking with your doctor or another member of your diabetes treatment team will help you decide which monitoring method is best for you.

When and how many times to test your levels each day will vary from person to person so you should follow the specific testing schedule your physician has established with you. Many schedules may call for once-daily testing while others require two or more testing time that might be before or after meal.

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Oct
24

Fall into some good habits: Take a hike!

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UntitledIn almost every corner of the country, fall signals a beautiful change in outside scenery or a reprieve from hot or cold conditions. Walking may be just the ticket for those looking to increase their exercise and physical activity.

Walking is one of the most highly recommended forms of physical activity for people with diabetes. It requires very little preparation and cost. It can be done practically anywhere – parks, malls, and in the street or the woods.

perform_shoeTake good care of your feet and they will take care of you. You might not spend a lot, but invest in good walking shoes. The shoes need to fit comfortably, with plenty of room in the toe area. They should not rub at the heel. Some walking shoes include an extra pair of eyelets close to your ankle. Lacing these may help prevent heel friction. Make sure your walkers have flatter, broader soles, which help improve balance.

Wear good socks. Cotton socks can bunch and retain moisture. Check out newer synthetic fabrics that wick moisture away from the skin.

A regular walk will be an effective way to control blood pressure. People living with diabetes should consider these tips from About Health magazine before taking off.

  • Begin slowly and easily. Walking just 5 or 10 minutes on the first day is perfectly acceptable if that’s all you can accomplish. The important thing is to not get injured or sore, which could end a walking campaign at the starting line.
  • Add 5 or 10 minutes per week. As one continues to improve, aim for 45 minutes to an hour, five to seven days per week. That’s an ideal amount of time for blood glucose maintenance. However, health benefits begin to accrue at just 30 minutes per day.
  • Break it up. Several 10- to 15-minute sessions are just as effective as one longer walk.
  • Count your steps. During the last few years, pedometers — small devices that clip to the belt to count steps — have become popular. They can help track total steps taken on daily walks, or all day long. Recording walking totals can be motivating.
  • Find a place to walk. If one’s neighborhood is unsafe, limit walking to daytime, walk in groups or try a nearby school track, community center or shopping mall.

For more on specialized shoes, check out the I-RUNNER line of diabetic shoes or our full line at Onlinestore-Diabetesms.com.

 

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Aug
21

There’s an app for that: Phone diabetes testing

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G_mate_monitoringThe technology to test and manage blood sugar results from smartphones took a big step this week. The Philosys group received 501K approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Gmate SMART Blood Glucose Monitoring System.

The Gmate SMART meter is not much bigger than a quarter. It connects to the headphone jack on the iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. It will use a free app to deliver blood glucose test results, without the use of an adapter or Bluetooth device.

The Gmate system will offer features such as goal setting, graphing, and the ability to email or text blood glucose test results directly to members of a diabetes care team.

Philosys is based in South Korea. Sales senior vice-president Mike Tickle said the company continues its efforts to be a technology leader for the diabetes mobile monitoring arena.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) suggests talking to your doctor about whether you should be checking your blood glucose. People that may benefit from checking blood glucose include those:

  • Taking insulin
  • That are pregnant
  • Having a hard time controlling blood glucose levels
  • Having low blood glucose levels
  • Having low blood glucose levels without the usual warning signs
  • Have ketones from high blood glucose levels

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) lists Monitoring among its seven self-care behaviors for people living with diabetes. The actions are often seen as goals ensuring improvement and the best control of blood sugar levels.

The following video shows how the device is used and some of its features.

For more information, visit:

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miss_idahofullChildren and adults living with diabetes are getting new inspiration from Miss Idaho who competed in her state’s pageant proudly wearing her insulin pump to the outside of her bikini bottom. Sierra Sandison, 20, not only won the pageant, but also inspired the masses with her hast tag challenge #ShowMeYourPump.

Sandison said “show me your pump” and her social media photo received nearly 5,000 likes and more than 3,000 shares. She also inspired several people to post pictures of themselves or their children proudly wearing insulin pumps.

As our understanding of diabetes increases, people living with diabetes are being given an expanded tool box of products and devices that can be used for treatment and daily management. Insulin pumps have been used since the 70s so as a category they are not new. They have, however, increased in popularity as the technology associated with them has evolved. Insulin delivery through a pump is popular with people with extremely busy lifestyles and the pumps may provide a more stable, consistent blood sugar control.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), offers an Insulin Pump 101 for those new to pumping and as an update on the latest features of the new class of insulin pumps. The pump parts and associated terminology are explained.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help you decide if pump therapy is right for you and help take the fear out of using an insulin pump.

They can also provide insulin pump training on all major insulin pumps. Working with your doctor, the educators can also help pumpers improve their control by helping them fine tune pump settings and avoid fluctuations in blood glucose as well as other pump and infusion site issues.

In addition to pump therapy, our educators can also teach people with diabetes how to use a CGM. For more information on specific monitoring or insulin delivery needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

miss_idahoSandison is determined to pass her pump pride to the masses.  “When I first started competing, I was using injections rather than a pump,” she wrote. “I didn’t want people to see a weird-tubey-machine-thing attached to me all the time, and could not wrap my head around having a medical device on my body for the rest of my life.

“Then, I heard about Nicole Johnson: Miss America 1999,” she wrote. “She wore her pump while competing at Miss America. My whole perspective changed.”

Now, your turn! Please share your experiences with us here or on the DMS Facebook page. You can also reach us through Twitter at @DiabetesMS. Show the world that while you have diabetes, diabetes does not have you … Show us your pump! #ShowMeYourPump

 

Jul
22

Partnership new hope for type 1 treatment

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The Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF) recently announced plans to seek a clinical trial to study a new cell replacement therapy to treat type 1 diabetes. JDRF, the leading type 1 diabetes research and advocacy group, is working with the drug company ViaCyte on the new therapy process.

JD_ViacyteJDRF and ViaCyte are collaborating on what they are calling the VC-01 therapy. ViaCyte has already submitted a MAF (Medical Device Master File) with the Food and Drug Administration for Encaptra, the drug delivery system that VC-01 uses.

The therapy seeks to mimic what the pancreas does in healthy people. Immature pancreatic cells are implanted under the skin inside of a thin plastic pouch. As they mature, the implanted cells should be able to sense when blood sugar is high and also produce insulin to restore blood sugar healthy levels. A person with type 1 diabetes has a pancreas with poor or no glucose-regulating functions.

“The promise of regenerative medicine is to replace what’s lost in the disease,” said Paul Laikind, President and CEO of Viacyte. “In our case, we’re seeking to replace the beta cell that produces insulin that controls blood glucose. In this way we hope to reduce the burden on patients with type 1 diabetes.”

The Learning Center of Diabetes Management & Supplies (DMS) explains that type 1 diabetes makes up only 5-10 percent of cases diabetes and used to be called juvenile diabetes. Three-quarters of people who develop type 1 are under the age of 18, and most others are under 40 years old, but older adults can also develop it.

The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most experts believe it is an autoimmune disorder, which is a condition that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. With type 1 diabetes, an infection or some other trigger causes the body to destroy the cells in the pancreas that make insulin.

Patients with type 1 diabetes are treated with insulin daily and take it with a syringe, insulin pen, or insulin pump. In addition, they may use a Continuous Glucose Monitoring system (CGM) to monitor their blood glucose constantly. All patients test their blood glucose levels multiple times each day.

DMS offers two options for the various supply needs related to diabetes management. The DMS Product Directory lists some of the products available to those using insurance to get supplies. The new DMS online store provides a secure, efficient setting to make cash sales with the convenience of credit card transactions. There is no need for insurance information or documentation when using the online store.

Customers can also even browse a vast selection of the latest insulin pumps and request a custom quote from the DMS pump staff.

For more on the new type 1 diabetes therapy

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Jul
11

New online store a complete supplies solution

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A name you know and trust – Diabetes Management & Supplies — has expanded in an effort to bring you more options and services. Our online store is now open and you can visit us at any time at www.Onlinestore-Diabetesms.com.

screen_item_launchShop our inventory of hundreds of products geared to the needs of people living with diabetes. Items include pump supplies, continuous glucose monitors, orthopedic shoes, test strips, meters and home health equipment. You can even browse our selection of the latest insulin pumps and request a custom quote from our expert staff!

The online store provides a secure, efficient setting to make all CASH sales with the convenience of credit card transactions. There is no need for insurance information or documentation to make your purchases. The items are purchased and shipped directly to your door.

Diabetes Management & Supplies is the largest diabetes supply company in Louisiana and ranks as one of the largest nationally, serving tens of thousands of people in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. It was recognized as the third fastest growing business in the state of Louisiana by New Orleans City-Business.

Visit our online store now and drop us an email if you have any questions or comments on how we can continue to be your committed health partner.

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.