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Archive for Diabetes in the News

Oct
06

Flu season precautions start in October

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flu-seasonThe Influenza Season should raise caution flags for both adults and children living with diabetes. Persons who are Type 1 or Type 2 are not more likely to catch the flu, but they are at a higher risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Complications that can develop from the flu include pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections.

The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control blood sugar. The illness might raise sugars, but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines  for people with diabetes.

Everyone 6 months and older should get a yearly flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible, but getting vaccinated later is OK. Vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some children who have received flu vaccine previously and children who have only received one dose in their lifetime, may need two doses of flu vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help educate and prepare individuals for the challenges of diabetes. For more information on the DMS diabetes education services, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

Related: Nasal sprays, FluMist out this year

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Oct
06

Alert: Nasal sprays, FluMist out this year

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Nasal sprays used in the past to prevent the spread of influenza should not be an option for the 2016-17 flu season.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is only recommending the use of injectable influenza vaccines this year.

The category of injectable vaccines includes inactivated influenza vaccines and recombinant influenza vaccines. The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2016-2017.

The nasal spray version of the flu vaccine was very popular with parents and pediatricians because many children are afraid of needles. This year, however, the nation’s leading pediatrics group is leaning to the side of caution.

In a policy statement recently released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the group recommended children over six months old receive the flu shot rather than the FluMist vaccine, which federal health officials have recently discovered was not effective in preventing the flu during the past three seasons. About a third of children who are vaccinated against the flu each year receive FluMist.

Everyone 6 months and older should get a yearly flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible, but getting vaccinated later is OK. Vaccination should continue throughout the flu season, even in January or later. Some children who have received flu vaccine previously and children who have only received one dose in their lifetime, may need two doses of flu vaccine. A health care provider can advise on how many doses a child should get.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help educate and prepare individuals for the challenges of diabetes. For more information on the DMS diabetes education services, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

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Mar
10

Later flu season shines light on sick-day prep

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flu-seasonAlthough the calendar says the influenza season should be over, cases of the flu are increasing into March 2016 instead of winding down to a close. Avoiding illness is a prime goal, but people living with diabetes should be aware of the special needs presented by sick days caused by the flu and other conditions.

The blood sugar targets for a sick day are the same as other days. A blood sugar reading over 180 mg/Dl is still a high blood sugar. The purpose of a sick day management plan and more vigilant testing has to do with limiting hyperglycemia and dehydration. The goals are to prevent DKA in the Type 1, avoid dehydration of the Type 2 individual and avoid potential hospitalizations for either individual.

A sick day plan should include these elements of good blood sugar control.  Monitoring, meals and medications are key while exercise or physical activity is usually halted during the illness.

The sick individual needs to follow a schedule for monitoring that gives the diabetes care team information to direct the modifications for the patient’s needs. Meals and eating will play an important role as medication will need to be adjusted to match rising or falling blood sugar levels. Medications are to be taken on the usual schedule or may be modified to meet the patient’s needs by the doctor or a member of the healthcare team.

Recording temperature, blood sugar, medication amount and time, fluid and food intake and the presence of ketones are highly important on sick days. This log or report will give insight to the diabetes care team of current health status and allow them to help adjust medication or intake to prevent dehydration or ketoacidosis.

The individual with diabetes or the parent/ care giver of the child with diabetes should be proactive in assessing conditions during an illness. Certain foods, testing equipment and testing supplies need to be handy before a sickness occurs.  The phone number of the doctor or diabetes care team should be readily available.

A log to monitor the sickness over time, glucose meter, lancets, lancing device, test strips, control solution, and a bottle of Ketostix should be included in a sick day management tool kit. The food pantry should contain: broth, both sugar-free and regular Jello, both diet and non-diet soft drinks, both sugar-free and regular popsicles, both thin and creamy soups, regular and sugar free pudding, yogurt, juice and milk.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that across the country, this flu season was significantly less severe than in the last few years, though number of cases have been increasing since early January.

Did you know the CDC tracks the flu like a hurricane? Visit CDC Flu Central for current reports, maps and alerts.

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Aug
14

Cloud-assisted blood sugar monitoring near

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cgm_googleThe future of glucose monitoring seemed very promising after a recent announcement that Dexcom, a leader in Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), announced plans to partner with Google to provide the next generation of monitoring technology that will involve smaller sensors and data stored “in the cloud” for instant archiving and record-keeping.

Dexcom will work with the new Google Life Sciences company to make bandage-thin CGM devices. Google Life Sciences, a part of the parent company Alphabet, is one of the companies created in a recent Google corporate reshuffling.

CGM devices give glucose readings continuously through the day. This helps people with diabetes track their blood sugar levels in more effectively. Blood sugar monitors use finger sticks for each reading, but CGM can provide up to 288 glucose readings a day. Most CGM users have type 1 diabetes, but some patients with type 2 diabetes who are insulin-dependent also use CGM.

Diabetes Management & Supplies is a certified distributor of Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices and a provider of diabetes education and insulin pump training. For more information on CGM, insulin delivery or training needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

For more on this CGM advancement, see:

Jun
29

Jockey with diabetes shares winners circle path

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chris_cardfrontChris Rosier is well on his mission of bringing hope and becoming a positive role model to children living with type 1 diabetes. Rosier, the Diabetes Management & Supplies spokesman, was invited to be a guest speaker at the annual Arizona American Diabetes Association’s Camp (AZDA) held at Friendly Pines.

Rosier and the campers discussed different types of pumps, testing strips, and more seriously, the struggles and stigma that follow this disease. “I don’t remember my life without diabetes,” said 14-year-old Ginger Netten of Scottsdale.

Rosier, 34, was in his mid-20s before he was diagnosed. “I went blind for a week,” Rosier said. “You want to make a grown man cry. Take away his sight.”

Learn more about Chris by visiting the DMS blog: Jockey set to motivate youth with diabetes.

Full article from the Daily Courier (AZ): Diabetes does not have to hold you back.

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Jun
05

Jockey set to motivate youth with diabetes

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Race days are fast-paced and exciting for jockey Chris Rosier, but they are also full of challenges and victories related to his life with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Management & Supplies is giving Rosier, the only professional jockey with Type 1 diabetes racing in the United States, an opportunity to greatly impact the lives of children living with diabetes.

chris_cardfrontRosier was born in San Diego, but he says he “grew up” at the horse tracks.  He traveled and moved around quite a bit and now calls Haughton in Bossier Parish his home. While he has competed in big and small arenas, he has the distinction of racing in one of the biggest events of all, the Kentucky Derby. Rosier rode Summer Bird to a sixth-place finish in the 2009 Kentucky Derby.

Rosier has been riding professionally since he was 19, but found out he had diabetes when he was in his early 20s. His diagnosis came shortly after he broke his collarbone during a spill off a horse. Later, he was stricken by temporary blindness. Soon after, his doctors diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes.

This summer, DMS will sponsor a series of appearances at diabetes camps for children.  Rosier will participate in Camp AZDA (Arizona Diabetes Association) June 6-12 and return to Louisiana in July for Camp Victory, the diabetes session of the Lions Club camps for children with medical or special needs.

Rosier, the company’s “Face of Diabetes,” is a part of the DMS patient family and feels it is important that children and teenagers know that diabetes does not limit them from having and achieving dreams. Rosier controls his diabetes with the help of Insulin Pump therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring. He wears both the Medtronic Insulin Pump and Enlite Continuous Glucose Monitor supplied by DMS.

Rosier has entered the Equibase Top 100 tier five times since 2000 and is currently ranked 145th out of 1,253 jockeys with $748,699 in earnings in 2015.

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Jan
30

Jockey relates and inspires youth with diabetes

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Race days are fast-paced and exciting for jockey Chris Rosier, but they are also full of the challenges and victories related to his life with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Management & Supplies is inviting a group of young people with diabetes to meet Rosier, the only professional jockey with Type 1 diabetes racing in the United States today.

A Day at the Races will be held on Lundi Gras, the Monday before Mardi Gras at the Fairgrounds in New Orleans. The participants range from 6 to 17.

web_chris_vertRosier, the company’s “Face of Diabetes,” is a member of the DMS patient family and he wants young children and teenagers to know that having diabetes does not limit them from having and achieving their dreams. Rosier controls his diabetes and with the help of Insulin Pump therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring. He wears both the Medtronic Insulin Pump and Enlite Continuous Glucose Monitor supplied by DMS.

The day of the event, Rosier will lead a tour of the stable and paddock. After the big race, each tour participant will be invited into the Winner’s Circle to take pictures with the winning jockey and horse.

Rosier was born in San Diego, but he says he “grew up” at the horse tracks.  He traveled and moved around quite a bit. He calls Haughton in Bossier Parish his home. While he has competed in big and small arenas, he has the distinction of racing in one of the biggest events of all, the Kentucky Derby. Rosier rode Summer Bird to a sixth-place finish in the 2009 Kentucky Derby.

Rosier has been riding professionally since he was 19, but found out that he had diabetes when he was in his early 20s. His diagnosis came shortly after he broke his collarbone during a spill off a horse. Later, he was stricken by temporary blindness. Soon after, his doctors diagnosed him with Type 1 diabetes.

He regained his health and strength, climbed back into the saddle and back into professional racing. He soon gained all the motivation he needed for his life and career. “I have three kids and a wife that support me and keep me going,” Rosier said.

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Oct
23

Vaccination best precaution in avoiding the flu

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flu-seasonThe nation is preparing for the start of the influenza (flu) season and people living with diabetes should make sure their fall plans include getting vaccinated against the flu. The U.S. flu season runs from late November until March. Because of changes in the various strains, last year’s flu shot will not protect you as a new season begins.

The Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. These viruses are “airborne,” which means they pass through the air and enter the body through the nose or mouth. Each year, the flu is caught by 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population. The flu can be serious or even deadly for elderly people, newborn babies, and people with chronic illnesses like diabetes.

Symptoms of the flu come on suddenly and are worse than those of the common cold.

  • Body or muscle aches
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Sore throat

Many people confuse catching a cold with the flu. Colds rarely cause fever or headaches. The flu rarely causes an upset stomach. The condition often called the “stomach flu” isn’t influenza at all, but gastroenteritis.

Most people who get influenza will recover in a few days to less than two weeks, but some people will develop complications (such as pneumonia) as a result of the flu. Complications of the flu can be life-threatening and result in death.

Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus and ear infections are examples of complications from flu. The flu can make chronic health problems worse. For example, people with asthma may experience asthma attacks while they have the flu, and people with chronic congestive heart failure may experience worsening of this condition that is triggered by the flu.

People living with diabetes are at greater risk of developing serious complications from the flu and are at a greater risk of having to be hospitalized after contracting the flu. Because of this increased risk, the flu shot should be considered mandatory for people with diabetes.

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Oct
23

Sick-day guidelines for people with diabetes

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If you have diabetes – even if your blood sugars are in good control – and are sick with flu-like illness, you should follow these additional steps:

  • Be sure to continue taking your diabetes pills or insulin. Don’t stop taking them even if you can’t eat. Your health care provider may even advise you to take more insulin during sickness.
  • Test your blood glucose every four hours, and keep track of the results.
  • Drink extra (calorie-free) liquids, and try to eat as you normally would. If you can’t, try to have soft foods and liquids containing the equivalent amount of carbohydrates that you usually consume.
  • Weigh yourself every day. Losing weight without trying is a sign of high blood glucose.
  • Check your temperature every morning and evening. A fever may be a sign of infection.
    Call your health care provider or go to an emergency room if any of the following happen to you:

    • You feel too sick to eat normally and are unable to keep down food for more than 6 hours.
    • You’re having severe diarrhea.
    • You lose 5 pounds or more.
    • Your temperature is over 101 degrees F.
    • Your blood glucose is lower than 60 mg/dL or remains over 250 mg/dL on 2 checks.
    • You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine.
    • You’re having trouble breathing.
    • You feel sleepy or can’t think clearly.

Also see Take Charge of Your Diabetes: Taking Care of Yourself When You Are Sick

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control

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Sep
03

Recent studies: small babies, big adults at risk

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Weight is a common factor when discussing diabetes. Two unrelated studies released this week, however, show how opposite ends of the weight issue can lead to the development of diabetes. Babies born at low birth weights and adults with higher than normal weights were shown to have an increased risk of developing diabetes.

Boston University researchers studied more than 20,000 black women ranging from age 21 to 69. They looked at many factors and focused on birth weight and cases of type 2 diabetes later in life.  Babies born at 5.5 pounds or less were 13 times more likely to develop diabetes. Babies born under or near 3 pounds were 40 percent more likely to develop diabetes in adulthood.

The connection between birth weight and adult-onset diabetes is seen in other demographics. Black women were studied because that group is more likely to have low birth weights and is also seen to have higher than normal cases of diabetes. The researchers feel that low birth weight leads to poor lipid regulation and problems with the pancreas.  They also point to theories that low weight at birth and diabetes share the same genetic source.

An unrelated study also released this week looked at the factors linked to the large increase in U.S. diabetes cases. The number of diabetes cases doubled from 1976 to 1980 and doubled again from 1999 to 2004.  The team concludes that skyrocketing obesity is the greatest factor in the diabetes epidemic.

Andy Menke, the lead researcher, explained that there has been a substantial increase in obesity in the U.S. population during the study period. Other factors linked to diabetes include race, ethnicity and age.

For more, visit:

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.