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Local diabetes supply company set to train people living with diabetes on use and benefits of continuous glucose monitors, time in range therapy

People living with diabetes, caregivers, health professionals and students are invited to free workshop on CGM use and self-care techniques on August 6th from 6 – 8 PM in New Orleans

New Orleans, LA – July 25, 2019 – New Orleans-based Diabetes Management & Supplies (DMS) has partnered with Medtronic, a global medical technology, services and solutions company to host the Your Time in Range Forum, an educational workshop designed to help people living with diabetes learn about self-managing the disease and improving their quality of life with continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and time in range therapy.

Diabetes is a chronic health condition that affects how the body turns food into energy. A person with diabetes, either doesn’t make enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it makes as well as they should. As a result, too much or too little blood sugar stays in the bloodstream. Over time, this could cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss and kidney disease. Time in range is the percentage of time glucose levels are in a normal range – between 70 – 180 mg/dL, per unit of time. More time in range means fewer severe highs and lows and could result in a healthier quality of life for people living with the disease.

“We are excited to bring this event to New Orleans and to educate people struggling with pre-diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes about techniques and technologies that will help them self-manage the disease,” said Cynthia Pazos, President of Diabetes Management & Supplies. “Our goal is to fill every seat and to inspire individuals living with diabetes to work towards maintaining a healthy lifestyle.”

Attendees will receive hands-on training on how to use CGMs and maintain time in range glucose levels. In addition, clinical healthcare professionals and DMS staff will be available to qualify patients for diabetes supplies and discuss self-managing techniques. Guests will enjoy healthy meal and dessert sampling from local chef, Ashley McMillan.

The forum will take place on Tuesday, August 6th from 6 – 8 PM at the Buddy Stall Diabetes Learning Center located at Diabetes Management & Supplies’ office at 10 Commerce Court, New Orleans (Elmwood Business Park), LA. The event is open to individuals living with diabetes and their families, caregivers, healthcare providers, healthcare technologists, nutrition experts and students. Seating is limited. Only the first 100 registrants can participate. To attend, email customerservice@diabetesms.com by August 2nd.

DMS has been in business for over 20 years in New Orleans. Ranked as one of the nation’s largest resources for patients who have diabetes, the company provides not only medical supplies to tens of thousands of individuals, but equips healthcare professionals, patients, and caregivers with a comprehensive education program for managing the disease.

About Diabetes Management & Supplies

Diabetes Management & Supplies was launched in 1997 by pharmaceutical and medical device industry veteran, Cynthia Pazos. As one of the largest distributors of diabetes products and supplies in the U.S., the company is dedicated to the prompt and proper fulfillment of customer’s needs for diabetic supplies. DMS offers the most complete selection of insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, blood glucose monitors, test strips, insulin syringes, orthopedic shoes, and medical home equipment. Today, DMS is the largest diabetes supply company in Louisiana and ranks as one of the largest nationally, serving tens of thousands of people in all fifty states and Puerto Rico.

Media Contact: Michelle Jackson

Diabetes Management & Supplies Media Liaison

t. (678) 548-2461

e. events@prsolutionsllc.org

Event Flyer:

Flyer v4

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Jul
29

10 Steps to Preparing for an Emergency

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By Eloise D. Keene, MS, MPH, RD, LDN, CDE, DMS Certified Diabetes Educator

When an individual has diabetes, it is important to have a plan in place in case of an emergency situation. These situations may be as a result of a natural disaster such as a flood, tornado, earthquake or hurricane; however, they can also be man-made disasters like gas leaks, power outages, hazardous chemical spills, or even fires. Any of these incidents may cause a person with diabetes to leave or evacuate from their current location and find themselves in an entirely different environment. Having a preparedness plan can make this transition for the person with diabetes easier and more efficient for all those involved.

Here’s how to prepare:
1. Wear a medical ID that informs everyone that you have diabetes.
2. When possible, have a to-go kit or bag already prepared for a possible evacuation (a must during
hurricane season). The bag should include:
  • A plastic baggie with a pen/pencil, notepad/notebook, your current prescription for oral or injected medications and supplies, your health insurance card, living will, and healthcare power of attorney information.
  • Contact information for your healthcare providers and two emergency contacts.
  • A letter from your diabetes healthcare team that provides your most current diabetes treatment regime.
  • If possible, a 30-day supply of all medications.
  • Blood glucose testing supplies with one or two meters and extra batteries.
  • CGM supplies for use with a continuous glucose monitoring system.
  • Insulin pump supplies to include, extra batteries, several infusion sets, several reservoirs or cartridges, and/or pods.
3. A cooler/ice chest with refreezable gel packs ready for insulin and unused injected medications.
4. Two to three day supply of non-perishable food (i.e. meal replacement bars and shakes, peanut butter, cheese crackers and dry cereal).
  • Three day or more supply of bottled water.
  • Rapid acting carbohydrate source to treat hypoglycemia (i.e. hard candy, 6 oz. juice boxes, regular soda, glucose tablets, sugar, honey, or glucose gel).
5. Containers or empty laundry detergent- type bottles for used testing or insulin delivery supplies.
6. First aid kit with cotton swabs, topical medications, bandages. etc.
7. Pack extra comfortable clothing, include extra underwear and socks.
8. Have a mobile phone with extra batteries or an extra charger.
9. Have cash stored in a waterproof and insulated to-go bag.
10. Select a designated location to meet if you and family members become separated and you are unable
to contact them.
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May
20

How healthy is your gut?

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Do you suffer from bloating, constipation, diarrhea or a lack of regularity?

Are you always hungry and cannot seem to control your appetite or maintain a healthy weight?

If so, you too are like many others who may be suffering from an unhealthy gut.

Now you may be wondering, what is all the talk about and why is there so much conversation about the gut?

The answer is simple; a healthy gut and GI tract may be the two secret keys to better health.

We see it on television, read it in magazines (especially at the supermarket), hear it on the radio, on podcasts and watch it on YouTube videos. Gut health is everywhere. Every health ambassador on every platform, preaching the importance of the health and wellbeing of the intestinal tract and the micro flora found within it.

The goal of the “healthy gut” is to get the entire gut flora back in “wack”, as scientific as that sounds. “Healthy gut” biome is great for nutrient absorption and toxic elimination. Science is starting to recognize that a unhealthy gut can cause symptoms that may cause stomach bloating, skin issues, obesity and even poor sleep.

A “healthy gut” can develop by eating more fermented foods and good bacteria. There are several foods that support the human microbiome, supply the right bacteria and then help to promote the “healthy gut”. These foods include both prebiotics and probiotics that initiate and maintain the healthiest environment inside one’s gut.

Prebiotics initiate and feed the gut’s micro flora. They are essential nutrients that nourish and grow the signals that initiate the healthiest responses from the immune and endocrine systems. Prebiotics are the source that nourishes and nurtures the growth of probiotics in the microbiome. Prebiotics can establish an environment for growth in the large intestinal tract with the most active, healthy microbiome that produces the signals for satiety, blood glucose regulation, immune system support, and gastric emptying regularity.

Foods that encourage a healthy gut are dairy free yogurt, yogurt and kefir. These foods contain strains of probiotics or good bacteria that are beneficial and that help repair the gut and possibly decrease some symptoms of “Irritable Bowel Syndrome.” Yogurt has three strains of good bacteria while kefir has ten strains of the active bacteria.

Garlic and onions are prebiotics that help feed the healthy bacteria that already exists in the gut. High fiber food choices like lentils and green beans improve the gut. Using coconut oil, a medium chain fatty acid can also produce a positive effect on the human micro biome.

Lastly, a source of both prebiotic and probiotic strength for wellness of the gut environment is found in chocolate. Of course, as with all food choices moderation is a key when adding this particular food to the individual’s meal plan.

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Apr
10

Fasting Safely

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spoonDuring the month of April, people of various faiths will celebrate holidays that will include religious or spiritual fasting. Lenten fasts of no meat on Fridays to the week-long and a day Passover ritual of abstaining from leaven breads, are religious practices and cultural beliefs that are followed by individuals of all ages and walks of life. Among the many who will fast are those with diabetes.

Generations of people who have Type 1, Type 2, or gestational diabetes, will celebrate their faith by limiting their intake of food, water or both items for one meal, a whole day, or even for several days.

The limitation of food or fluid intake for even just one meal can have an effect on a person with diabetes, therefore, it becomes important for those with the disease to recognize the symptoms of a potential hypoglycemic episode, to know how to adjust insulin to match carbohydrate intake, to alter physical activity and to understand how to use medical technologies to help them maintain good glucose management while they practice their religious observances.
Tips for fasting safely:
  • Always speak with your doctor or health care provider or diabetes educator before starting a fast.
  • Wear diabetes medical alert jewelry - bracelet, necklace, dog tags - at all times.
  • Keep emergency contact information on you where it can be quickly found.
  • Understand that fasting can affect medication regimes – a change in eating schedules can directly affect when medications are taken.
  • Check blood glucose more frequently.
  • Do remember for many religions, there are exemptions from participating in the fast if doing so would jeopardize the health and safety of the individual.
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Apr
06

Glucose control key in avoiding kidney damage

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Good blood sugar control today will reduce the risk of damage to kidneys and other organs tomorrow.

kidney_chartThe kidneys filter waste products from your blood and keep fluids in your body balanced. Having diabetes puts you at a greater risk for developing kidney disease also called diabetic nephropathy. This complication is also called diabetic kidney disease. It is a progressive kidney disease caused by damage to the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys that are used to filter waste from the blood.

High blood glucose, sometimes paired with high blood pressure, slowly damages the kidneys. High blood sugar makes the kidneys filter too much blood. All this extra work is hard on the filters. After many years, they start to leak and useful protein is lost in the urine.

People living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes can experience kidney complications. Chronic hyperglycemia, excess blood sugar, is the primary cause of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, hyperglycemia starts in the first decades of life and is usually the only recognized cause of nephropathy. With type 2 diabetes, to the contrary, hyperglycemia starts near middle-age, usually when the kidneys have already suffered the long‐term consequences of aging and of other recognized promoters of chronic renal injury such as arterial hypertension, obesity, high cholesterol, and smoking.

Early detection of kidney damage is important, but there might not be noticeable symptoms in the early stages. It’s important to have regular urine tests to find kidney damage early because early kidney damage might be reversed.

Later in the progression, swelling in your body is a primary symptom. The feet and legs are key areas where swelling will be seen as kidneys become damaged.

Keeping blood sugar as close to normal as possible is the first step to preventing kidney disease. Control your blood pressure by checking it on a regular basis and following your doctor’s recommendations for acceptable levels. Finally, don’t use tobacco because it narrows your blood vessels including the already tiny ones working deep inside your kidneys.

Educating individuals on best ways to avoid this and other diabetes complications is a goal of self-management courses. If you need help developing a strategy to avoid complications or face other challenges, Diabetes Management & Supplies can assist with diabetes self-management and education services. For more information, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

Mar
23

Hitting the road: Have pump, CGM will travel!

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one_touch_chartWhether you have already planned a summer vacation or still in the process, incorporate your pump or CGM needs into your travel plans instead of treating your needs as an afterthought or an overwhelming fear. There’s nothing new under the sun and you can also reap the benefits of those who have traveled the vacation path before you.

Flying through the screening process? You don’t have to encounter problems passing through security at an airport. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has a helpline number to assist patients with medical conditions who want to prepare for the screening process prior to flying. Call TSA Cares toll free at 1-855-787-2227.

You can obtain a Transportation Security Administration Card to print out and bring with you to notify TSA of your diabetes can be found online.  If you have concerns about wearing an insulin pump or CGMS through scanners, contact the manufacturer of your medical device.

Tips for traveling while wearing an Insulin Pump or CGM

  • Always have Plan B in place in case something goes wrong with your current device, such as carrying syringes or pens to give injections and carrying extra supplies in case you run low.
  • Be sure to carry some form of prescription or letter from your physician that treats you for your diabetes.
  • Carry all of your medicines, such as insulin, and all related supplies in your carry-on baggage. Be sure to place these items in a clear plastic bag that is labeled. It will help to remove this bag from your luggage so that the TSA officials can clearly see what is inside. Also, in case your checked luggage is lost, you will still have your insulin and supplies with you in your carry-on bag.
  • If you wear an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring device, it is OK to continue to keep them on as you go through security at airports or terminals. The scanners will not harm these devices in anyway. Please notify the TSA officials as you move through the checkpoints that you are wearing a pump or CGM. Usually, the TSA official will pull you to the side and do a more thorough search of the device, such as swabbing the pump or monitor and/or your hands.

A printed checklist might help elevate stress and keep your plan in your hands, front and center. Medtronic, an industry leader in insulin delivery systems, has a downloadable checklist for traveling with a pump and/or CGM. Click HERE for a copy.

Learning how to handle life’s challenges like traveling and treatment plans is a covered topic in diabetes self-management courses. If you need help developing life and treatment strategies, Diabetes Management & Supplies can assist with diabetes self-management and education services. For more information, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

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Mar
10

Later flu season shines light on sick-day prep

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flu-seasonAlthough the calendar says the influenza season should be over, cases of the flu are increasing into March 2016 instead of winding down to a close. Avoiding illness is a prime goal, but people living with diabetes should be aware of the special needs presented by sick days caused by the flu and other conditions.

The blood sugar targets for a sick day are the same as other days. A blood sugar reading over 180 mg/Dl is still a high blood sugar. The purpose of a sick day management plan and more vigilant testing has to do with limiting hyperglycemia and dehydration. The goals are to prevent DKA in the Type 1, avoid dehydration of the Type 2 individual and avoid potential hospitalizations for either individual.

A sick day plan should include these elements of good blood sugar control.  Monitoring, meals and medications are key while exercise or physical activity is usually halted during the illness.

The sick individual needs to follow a schedule for monitoring that gives the diabetes care team information to direct the modifications for the patient’s needs. Meals and eating will play an important role as medication will need to be adjusted to match rising or falling blood sugar levels. Medications are to be taken on the usual schedule or may be modified to meet the patient’s needs by the doctor or a member of the healthcare team.

Recording temperature, blood sugar, medication amount and time, fluid and food intake and the presence of ketones are highly important on sick days. This log or report will give insight to the diabetes care team of current health status and allow them to help adjust medication or intake to prevent dehydration or ketoacidosis.

The individual with diabetes or the parent/ care giver of the child with diabetes should be proactive in assessing conditions during an illness. Certain foods, testing equipment and testing supplies need to be handy before a sickness occurs.  The phone number of the doctor or diabetes care team should be readily available.

A log to monitor the sickness over time, glucose meter, lancets, lancing device, test strips, control solution, and a bottle of Ketostix should be included in a sick day management tool kit. The food pantry should contain: broth, both sugar-free and regular Jello, both diet and non-diet soft drinks, both sugar-free and regular popsicles, both thin and creamy soups, regular and sugar free pudding, yogurt, juice and milk.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that across the country, this flu season was significantly less severe than in the last few years, though number of cases have been increasing since early January.

Did you know the CDC tracks the flu like a hurricane? Visit CDC Flu Central for current reports, maps and alerts.

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Feb
09

Goals can pack more punch than resolutions

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SMART-goals

The start of each year is a prime time to consider your life, health and ways to improve both. Motivation and method are both key to setting new goals and ending your year with a sense of accomplishment.

Good health is important, but it will not just happen. SMART Goals provide a road map to success because those goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely.

Diabetes is often a numbers game: blood sugar level, A1C, weight, etc. Beyond those faceless figures, one should focus on goals that bolster your diabetes control. “I want to lower my A1C to 7, but ‘why?’”

If you want to accomplish a task, you set a plan, you set deadlines and you take action. Most people are familiar with SMART goals in the workplace, but they also apply to health. For example, let’s say you wanted to an A1C of 7.5, but your level is now 11. It would be unrealistic to say you wanted reduce your A1C to 11 in next month.

It would be more realistic to set up a SMART goal:

  • Specific – I will decrease my average fasting blood sugar by 2 points each week.
  • Measureable – I will keep track of blood sugar levels three times daily so I can track my
    progress towards my goal.
  • Attainable – Is the goal attainable for me? Your diabetes care team should be consulted about ways to reduce your A1C and risk of complications.
  • Realistic – Is the goal realistic for me? Lowering one’s blood sugar is a great goal, but drastic drops can increase changes of hyperglycemia.
  • Timely – I will make an appointment with my care team every three months in 2016 to evaluate my A1C with hopes to start 2017 near 7.5.

Other goals that will impact blood sugar control include getting regular and sufficient exercise, gaining or losing weight, following a diabetes nutrition plan, and being more compliant to medication schedules.

Need help turning your goals into a viable game plan? Diabetes Management & Supplies offers diabetes self-management and diabetes education services. For more information on specific needs or to enroll in group or individual sessions, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929 or email education@diabetesms.com.

The National Diabetes Education Program, a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offers an online resource for making a plan for success. Visit Diabetes Health Sense and make your plan today!

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Feb
01

Monitoring: It’s a numbers game you can win!

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Blood sugar levels are tested in your doctor’s office, but that is not enough. Blood sugar changes not only from day to day. It changes from hour to hour. Some people run high in the morning and others at night. Certain foods might cause a spike. A long walk may drop levels too low.

Glucose monitors are machines that measure blood sugar from finger sticks. Continuous glucose monitors are worn on the body. They records several readings a day without finger sticks.

Why test your blood sugar?

  • Tell how well you’re reaching health goals
  • Know how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels
  • Know how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels
  • See the effect of diabetes drugs on blood sugar levels
  • Know when blood sugars are too high or low

To get a full picture of your diabetes, you need regular monitoring. Testing often will show problem areas and how your levels react to certain foods. A blood sugar reading might be an early warning sign in sudden illness.

Another method of monitoring blood glucose is Continuous Glucose Monitoring or CGM. A CGM automatically takes several blood sugar readings throughout the day, sends alerts for extreme readings and feeds those levels to the insulin pump. The goal would be blood sugar control that is consistently stable.

The CGM reads blood sugar levels every one to five minutes and shows whether a person’s blood sugar is rising or falling. Combining CGM with insulin pump therapy can provide a method to monitor and manage blood glucose levels. The information obtained can also help to fine-tune the pump settings.

The American Heart Association offers these tools to help you understand the importance of monitoring and staying as healthy as possible:

  • Diabetes-Friendly Recipes. Recipes to satisfy cravings – sweet, savory or somewhere in between.
  • My Diabetes Health Assessment. Having type 2 diabetes greatly increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Learn your 10-year risk and ways you can lower it.
  • Diabetes Quiz. Take this short quiz to learn the facts about diabetes.

The diabetes educators at Diabetes Management & Supplies can help take the guess-work out of your monitoring needs. For more information on specific monitoring or insulin delivery needs, call our Education Department at 1-888-738-7929.

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Dec
18

Holiday season may host seasonal depression

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The holiday season may help bring attention to a rarely-discussed diabetes symptom: depression. Whether emphasized by SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) or just noticed in contrast to the festive season, depression may be one sign of diabetes or a flag that one’s diabetes is not in good control.

The American Diabetes Association explains that people with diabetes are at a greater risk to depression and the complications of poorly controlled blood sugars are very similar to the symptoms of depression.

Spotting depression in yourself or someone you love is an important step to countering depressions effects. The signs include:

  • Loss of pleasure: You no longer take interest in doing things you used to enjoy.
  • Change in sleep patterns: You have trouble falling asleep, you wake often during the night, or you want to sleep more than usual, including during the day.
  • Early to rise: You wake up earlier than usual and cannot to get back to sleep.
  • Change in appetite: You eat more or less than you used to, resulting in a quick weight gain or weight loss.
  • Trouble concentrating: You can’t watch a TV program or read an article because other thoughts or feelings get in the way.
  • Loss of energy: You feel tired all the time.
  • Nervousness: You always feel so anxious you can’t sit still.
  • Guilt: You feel you “never do anything right” and worry that you are a burden to others.
  • Morning sadness: You feel worse in the morning than you do the rest of the day.
  • Suicidal thoughts: You feel you want to die or are thinking about ways to hurt yourself.

You should contact your doctor if you see any three of these signs. Taking action can affect both your mental and physical well-being.

Visit the ADA for more on the link between diabetes and depression.

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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.