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Archive for Holidays

Nov
29

Healthy Holiday Eating

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Holidays do not have to disrupt your diabetes control.

 

TisTheSeason

When families gather, food is always involved—especially during the holidays. While it may be a challenge to maintain good blood sugar control during this time, it can be done!

When attending a party, try to eat something—at least a snack—before going. That way you won’t be as tempted or hungry to over do it on high calorie foods that you will likely be faced with. Examples of healthy snacks to eat before a party include 2% string cheese, yogurt or a piece of fruit.

Bring a healthy food item with you to the party so that you know there will be something good for you to eat there. A fruit tray for instance would be a better alternative than a tray of brownies. Or cut up raw vegetables with a low fat dip instead of chips and dip. Sit in a room different from where the food is being served. Gather and talk with friends away from the food so you won’t be as likely to munch as you’re catching up with friends or family.

Think before you drink! During the holidays, alcohol is often mixed with sugary beverages in a punch which can increase blood sugar. The alcohol may also lessen your desire and ability to make good food choices.

Up the exercise! We know we will be faced with more food and probably eat more food during holiday season. Off set this increase in food with an increase in exercise. Make it a point to exercise more often—especially on the days you will be attending a party. While this won’t cancel out the food, it will certainly help with blood sugar control and weight maintenance.

Lastly, shift your focus from weight loss to weight maintenance. Be realistic with yourself and you will feel more in control if you just try to get through the holidays without gaining weight.

Categories : Holidays, Nutrition
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Dec
18

Holiday season may host seasonal depression

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The holiday season may help bring attention to a rarely-discussed diabetes symptom: depression. Whether emphasized by SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) or just noticed in contrast to the festive season, depression may be one sign of diabetes or a flag that one’s diabetes is not in good control.

The American Diabetes Association explains that people with diabetes are at a greater risk to depression and the complications of poorly controlled blood sugars are very similar to the symptoms of depression.

Spotting depression in yourself or someone you love is an important step to countering depressions effects. The signs include:

  • Loss of pleasure: You no longer take interest in doing things you used to enjoy.
  • Change in sleep patterns: You have trouble falling asleep, you wake often during the night, or you want to sleep more than usual, including during the day.
  • Early to rise: You wake up earlier than usual and cannot to get back to sleep.
  • Change in appetite: You eat more or less than you used to, resulting in a quick weight gain or weight loss.
  • Trouble concentrating: You can’t watch a TV program or read an article because other thoughts or feelings get in the way.
  • Loss of energy: You feel tired all the time.
  • Nervousness: You always feel so anxious you can’t sit still.
  • Guilt: You feel you “never do anything right” and worry that you are a burden to others.
  • Morning sadness: You feel worse in the morning than you do the rest of the day.
  • Suicidal thoughts: You feel you want to die or are thinking about ways to hurt yourself.

You should contact your doctor if you see any three of these signs. Taking action can affect both your mental and physical well-being.

Visit the ADA for more on the link between diabetes and depression.

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Dec
18

Plan for a safe, healthy holiday party season

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blog_art_holiday
Holidays can be hard when you are trying to handle your diabetes. When family and friends gather, food is often involved. Routines are often disregarded for parties, shopping, cooking and decorating. Learning how to choose the best foods for you can be stressful.

Keep in mind that New Years and Christmas are days to relax and celebrate. Treat yourself to your favorite stuffing or homemade pie on these days.  Keep these treats to the holidays. You will then avoid turning this time into a whole season of blood sugar trouble.

These tips can help you stay on track during the holidays:

  • Drink water and eat a snack before you go to parties. You won’t make choices when hungry.
  • Be sure to eat some food when drinking alcohol. This will help prevent low blood sugar.
  • Help out the host. If you are going to a party, call first and ask if you can bring a dish. Now, you will know there will be food that fits into your needs.
  • Look for hidden carbohydrates. Gravies, soups, dips and salads can have flour, sugar, potatoes, corn and bread. Remember to count these foods with your allowed carbohydrates per meal.
  • Don’t forget about free foods such as non-starchy vegetables. These foods fill you up, but will not affect your blood sugar. Chicken, turkey and cheese are often on party trays. These are not free foods so it is important to be aware of portion size and servings.
  • Work in exercise. Just a 15-minute walk before or after a holiday party can help to keep your blood sugar in control when you are celebrating.

Enjoy your holidays. Make good choices to keep your blood sugar in control. This will allow you to have many more healthy and happy holidays.

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Dec
24

Make a holiday meal game plan

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bigstock-Christmas-Time-500From the desk of Ellen Smith RD, LDN
Diabetes Management & Supplies

Holidays can be hard when you are trying to handle your diabetes. When family and friends gather, food is often involved. Routines are often disregarded for parties, shopping, cooking and decorating. Learning how to choose the best foods for you can be stressful.

Keep in mind that Thanksgiving and Christmas are days to relax and celebrate. Treat yourself to your favorite stuffing or homemade pie on these days.  Keep these treats to Thanksgiving and Christmas. You will then avoid turning this time into a whole season of blood sugar trouble.

These tips can help you stay on track during the holidays:

  • Drink water and eat a snack before you go to parties. You won’t make choices when hungry.
  • Be sure to eat some food when drinking alcohol. This will help prevent low blood sugar.
  • Help out the host. If you are going to a party, call first and ask if you can bring a dish. Now, you will know there will be food that fits into your needs.
  • Look for hidden carbohydrates. Gravies, soups, dips and salads can have flour, sugar, potatoes, corn and bread. Remember to count these foods with your allowed carbohydrates per meal.
  • Don’t forget about free foods. Chicken, turkey, cheese and non-starchy vegetables are great. These foods fill you up, but will not affect your blood sugar.
  • Work in exercise. Just a 15-minute walk before or after a holiday party can help to keep your blood sugar in control when you are celebrating.

Enjoy your holidays. Make good choices to keep your blood sugar in control. This will allow you to have many more healthy and happy holidays.

 

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Nov
12

Turkey leftovers give diabetes-friendly options

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IMAG3877

gif_turkey002PR_cAs we approach the holidays and observe Diabetes Awareness Month, Chef John Wright offers some suggestions on using turkey leftovers and ways to incorporate turkey into your eating plan.

Meals built around turkey can be more than just holiday favorites. Turkey is low in fat and high in protein. It is cheap source of iron, zinc, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins. A serving of turkey is a 2 to 3-ounce cooked portion. The Food Guide Pyramid suggests 2 to 3 servings from the meat group each day.

The following portions represent 100 grams, approximately 3 1/2 ounces, of sliced meat from a whole roasted turkey. A 3 1/2-ounce portion of turkey is about the size and thickness of a new deck of cards. The fat and calorie content varies because white meat has less fat and fewer calories than dark meat and skin.

As you ponder menu items for your leftover holiday bird, consider these recipes from Chef Wright:

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Nov
12

Roasted Turkey Chicken Salad

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IMAG3879-11 cup roasted turkey, chopped

2 tablespoons low fat mayonnaise

5 red seedless grapes cut in half

2 teaspoons chopped pecans

Salt and pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients and mix well.  Put mixture into a half of whole wheat pita with lettuce and tomato and serve.

Categories : Holidays, Nutrition, Recipes
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1 whole wheat tortilla (8 inch)
¾ cup chopped roasted turkey
½ cup shredded pepper jack cheese
1 teaspoon olive oilturkey-leftovers

Place half of pepper jack cheese on bottom half of tortilla.  Put chopped turkey on top and then put remainder of pepper jack cheese on top of the turkey.  Fold tortilla in half.  Heat non-stick skillet to medium and put 1 teaspoon olive oil in skillet and brown each side of the tortilla, about 3 minutes each side.  Remove from pan and cut into wedges and serve.

Categories : Holidays, Nutrition, Recipes
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Nov
07

Turkey soup a cozy, but smart meal option

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soup_bowl22

The fall change in weather and the approaching holidays bring opportunities for soup with meals and ideas that use a fall holiday favorite – turkey. Hearty Wild Rice Turkey Soup is not just a turkey dish, but it also offers a wise choice for those living with diabetes and those trying to eat healthier.

Whether your turkey is cubed from the deli or leftovers from a holiday meal, it offers a lean, high protein ingredient. Turkey breast is low in fat and contains only about 30 calories per ounce. The recipe referenced calls for about 8 ounces of chopped turkey in the entire dish.

The dish is also a low-carb delight because its main source of carbohydrates – long grain wild rice – adds only about 10 grams of carbs per serving. Uncle Ben’s Wild Rice also provides a hearty, nutty flavor and is a source of fiber, protein and whole grains.

IMAG3811This dish contains tasty fresh vegetables (onions and celery) that are sautéed in a margarine-type spread instead of oil. The Diabetes Management & Supplies “I’m in Control” program recommends using plant stanols to get a heart-health benefit.  Plant stanols or plant sterol esters lower total cholesterol and LDL.

They are found in fortified items such as margarine-type spreads, orange juice, cheese, and yogurts.  These products can be found in your local grocery story.

Recommended intake 2 grams /day = 2 Tbsp of these:

  • Smart Balance®
  • Promise Activ®
  • Benecol®

The rest of the soup contains your choice of canned or frozen vegetables. The examples shown use a frozen blend of corn, green beans, peas and carrots. If you use canned veggies, it is recommended that you rinse them thoroughly to eliminate the excess salt. There’s plenty of salt in the low-sodium chicken broth and no other salt was added in cooking or at the table.

See recipe: Hearty Wild Rice Turkey Soup

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Nov
07

Hearty Wild Rice Turkey Soup

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soup3_redo

1 TBSP heart-healthy buttery spread containing phytosterols  (Benecol, Smart Balance, or Promise Activ)

2 TBSP finely chopped white onion

2 medium (6 inches) celery ribs, chopped

¼ tsp black pepper

8 oz leftover chopped cooked turkey (about 2 cups)

2 cans (14.5 oz) fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth

1 cup leftover (or frozen) chopped mixed vegetables

1 cup cooked wild rice blend, any brand

½ tsp onion powder

½ tsp ground thyme

In a medium saucepan (2-3 quarts), melt margarine over medium heat. Add chopped onion and celery and sauté until vegetables are softened. Sprinkle with black pepper. Added chopped turkey, broth, vegetables, rice, onion powder and thyme. Bring to a simmer and cover. Cook 20 minutes. Serve with whole grain crackers.

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cooking time: 25 minutes

Serving Size: 1 cup

Per serving: Calories: 127 | Carbohydrate: 10g | Protein: 15g | Fat: 3g | Saturated fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 36mg | Sodium: 149mg | Fiber: 2g

Exchanges per serving: ½ starch |  2 lean meat | Carbohydrate choices: ½

Categories : Holidays, Nutrition, Recipes
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Dec
14

Healthy holiday meal a super gift

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The words “healthy, holiday, dining” may not seem to go together, but it is possible to entertain and dine during the holidays and still keep your health goals in mind. Chef John Wright of Diabetes Management and Supplies sets a festive and diabetic-friendly tone in the latest Eating Wright segment.

Chef Wright’s meal starts with Cranberry and Blue Cheese Salad and homemade Sun-dried Cranberry Vinaigrette dressing. He then serves seared pork tenderloin, mashed sweet potatoes and sautéed vegetable medley. He topped the sweet potatoes with seasoned, roasted pecans.

Check out these related posts:

Categories : Holidays, Nutrition, Recipes
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Ordering Supplies and Equipment

A diabetes treatment plan is very important. Make sure you know how things should work. Carefully following any medication orders and instructions is vital to your plan's success. Make sure you don't run out of supplies just as you refill prescriptions so you don't run out of medication.

Here are some ways you can let us help you reorder supplies:

At Diabetes Management & Supplies, we value the part we play on your treatment plan team and realize that winning is promoting good health.